>>>>

Tuesday, July 09, 2019

Navigating the Quilt Vault!


Untouched and no filters!

i am always receiving questions such as: "Just what do you DO with all of your quilts?”

I honestly think that most folks forget this is my job. And without all of these quilts I wouldn’t be able to do my job.

Because I teach and I lecture I need these quilts on hand. I will decide what to do with them after I retire. When people ask me questions like this I don't know whether to be cautious as if being judged, feel guilty, or turn it around and ask them what they do with theirs.

What are they exactly trying to say when they ask me questions like this?  Has anyone asked you this?  And how do you reply?

Is there such a thing as too many quilts?


And is it rude to ask someone what they are doing or intend to do with all of their quilts (Or fill in the blank….Shoes? Purses? Jewelry? Cats? Nick knacks?

Does the world outside these walls really need to know?

So I took this little video just to show you what I deal with every time I pack/unpack for or from a trip.  Click to Play:




I’m not asking for suggestions – this works for me.  The quilts are folded differently every time.  They are stacked mostly by book title or mysteries or leader & ender quilts, etc. 

Through the year I switch out the quilts on the beds, I'll put different ones over couches or chairs - the quilts circulate.

Pool noodles will not work on quilts Queen size or larger – and pants hangers won’t either – the quilts would be too heavy for the rod.  Believe me, they are HEAVY!


Packing for 3 weeks on the road!

What started all of this is my packing for all of my July events – and making sure I don’t forget anything!  It’s going to be a full-up July and it starts tomorrow night with a lecture in Louisville, Kentucky as a kick off for our retreat weekend with The Cozy Quilter

Will I see you there?


And now that the long arm is gone….

After all things were packed in the van and ready to roll, I found myself with a few evening hours, a desire to sew, and a fairly empty sewing room!

(And I was in no mood to vacuum!)

I was able to slide my cutting table into this space from the other side of the basement thanks to the use of carpet sliders underneath.  I love those things!

I set up another table for the Accuquilt Studio in the corner.

I’m not sure if this is where things will stay – there is loads of space to move things around and set this up the way I want, but when I have more time. 

With my big monitor gone to the QPO, I found myself plugging in an old stereo (No Bluetooth and no WiFi capability! ANCIENT!) and actually flipping through some old CD cases and playing music I haven’t listened to in years.  It felt good. It sounded GREAT.  And it was nice to be the one to make the choice on what I was listening to instead of some Pandora station throwing up whatever they think I want to hear. 

*Note to Self*  Play CDs more!


Getting that binding on!

I found fabric for the sleeve – leftovers from the backing fabric I used.  I attached a label (to be signed later – no pen here! LOL!) I’ve got hours of hand stitching ahead and it feels so good.


Love the scrappy red binding for this quilt!


And Dresden couldn’t hardly be bothered -

It’s HOT out.  Last night it was 88 with 88% humidity.  No breeze.  88 in the mountains is loads cooler than 88 down here.  Believe me.  It’s no wonder he likes to lie on the cool tile.


But all of that humidity makes things GREEN!

I took this photo this morning – Jeff was mowing last night just before dark while I was in binding land.  It’s so lush out there!

In all honesty, I wish I could stay an extra day or two.  I’d love to reorganize my basement space now that the long arm machine is out – but this morning there are two appointments – one of them for the immunizations I need to go to Kenya in October.  Weeee!  It’s getting closer.  I hate needles, but I hate the thought of getting sick even more.

From there – it’s back up to Virginia.  I’ll be heading up to Kentucky bright and early on Wednesday morning, and it is closer from the cabin than it is from here.


Quiltville Quote of the Day -

Vintage Log Cabin quilt found in North Carolina.

You never know, your next big adventure could be right around the corner. It could be close to home. It could be far away.

I think the exciting thing about life is that we really can't look too far ahead, we have to experience it bit by bit as it happens.

Let the July road trips begin!

Happy Tuesday, folks!


83 comments:

  1. I feel your pain over this, today I am packing for a trunk show and lecture and I get asked the same question. I use a few, the majority are teaching samples. When I am no longer teaching they will be given out to any extended family members that would like one, and the rest will be donated to charitable causes. I feel that people are just curious as to where they are kept and in awe that I have so many. Have a wonderfully adventurous trip.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have more quilts than beds and family. But no plans to slow down. The creative process is what I crave. My kids are always happy to have a quilt when I decide to down size. If not charities await!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I restore vintage sewing machines, I am frequently asked how many I own. My answer, I don’t know, I don’t count them.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Of course it's ok for others to ask WHAT DO YOU DO WITH ALL THESE QUILTS. There are a lot of people who only make quilts for a purpose. Ie. a gift, for themselves or a show. They cannot imagine making them just because.
    There are also people who make quilts just because they love the hobby and the quilts will find a home eventually.
    There are quilters that make quilts for their work. They make patterns and sell them trying to survive.
    Others make them for charity and to feel good helping others out.
    Some people cannot understand others point of view.
    Maybe they are only asking as you design so many and enjoy sharing your patterns with everyone. Wether it be to sell or just for fun--- you do have a lot just sitting at home.
    Look at it as curious as some cannot see why others have quilts around and not for a reason. Enjoy the fact that you are able to have them around for 1 day you might need them. You may decide to show, sell or gift them.

    Take it as a compliment as you have them wondering.
    Keep enjoying what you do for you.. LET THEM WONDER.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice answer. There is really no difference in having a collection of quilts than having a collection of knickknacks, except quilts are useful, and you don't have to dust them every week. Teehee

      Delete
    2. Love both your answers!

      Delete
  5. I get that question a LOT as well! I tell them they will go in an estate sale when I die, at least the ones I don't give to family.

    ReplyDelete
  6. While I would never dream of asking that question, in that way, I might ask it if we were close friends. The reason? I live in a small home and having limited space to use and store quilts is one thing that mentally makes me limit my production so new ideas of how to use them would be my goal.

    And honestly, it's a rare day when I'm in the mood to vacuum. Nice to know I'm in good company.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I get asked the same question as well. I have a very large family and many think they can buy a quilt for $25 for a shower because I have a surplus supply. I sold a couple to sisters in law but I could tell they were shocked when I told them the price of materials only. I will no longer sell my quilts but am happy to give them away to raffles, they are much more appreciated. I've been swooning over your sewing room and can fully understand why you wish you could be home to play around in there. Safe travels in the next three weeks.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow! You get to nearly rebuild the North Carolina quilt room. Imagine all those times you said, "I wish I had", but couldn't move things to better fit your current sewing style and quilting projects. This will probably be lots of work and hopefully fit your current use of the house better.
    On to the woman's question about keeping your quilts. Of course we are curious about THE Bonnie Hunter's quilts. We got great ideas for organizing just today, especially for new teachers and pattern designers. It's great to know that your quilts get used for beds and couches just like ours do. Photos of you and your pets have shown us the quilts in use, too.
    So, enjoy Kentucky. I was disappointed to be out of state for this upcoming trip. But, my sister, Terri S., will be there for a class. She is so excited! Give her a hug from me, please.
    Connie

    ReplyDelete
  9. What to do with my quilts? I think for everyone of us that is a different answer just like what’s for dinner!
    Do we need to make more quilts? That is a different answer for each of us as well. Making quilts makes me happy, soothes me when I’m upset, and lets my creativity flow. What I do with them after they are made is again up to me.
    I refuse to be shamed for making too many or having to many. They bring me joy!
    Thanks Bonnie for all that you do and how openly and honestly you share with all of us!
    Mary K in New Mexico

    ReplyDelete
  10. I agree with Jo. Take the comment as one of curiosity and not criticism. Actually, it may be quite a compliment. You are prolific in your quilting. Many of us would like to be, but are not as organized as you are.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I also get asked what do you do with your quilts. I laugh and say I have grandchildren who don't think you can have too many quilts. I always wonderedwhy my mom did miniature quilts, she moved into assisted living and has one on her door, and she swaps them out regularly. Every quilt has a place

    ReplyDelete
  12. of course people ask questions. Many think we"own" you! Your willingness to share yourself, your thoughts, your emotions, make us think we know you personally, and ask questions because we want to be you! Well, maybe not exactly, but sort of... you are a rock star and we are your fans, perhaps intrusive when you take a quick look, but I'm thinking most of us are coming from love and honest interest, because inquiring minds want to know. Cats from Carlsbad CA

    ReplyDelete
  13. That is one dilemma isn’t it? You do need your samples and queen size is tricky to store. I am guessing a custom shelving would help that you could label so you could find them. Hope you do find a solution that works, for right now your system works and it is yours - go for it!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Only a non-quilter would ask that question. They just don't get it and that's ok. I am often asked that question. I don't teach or publish patterns. but I give many of them away. I quilt because it brings me (and hopefully those to whom I gift a quilt) joy. I told the kids they get first dibs and when I pass, they can haul the others to the church and let folks take what they want. So I say, quilt on - you don't need to answer to anyone.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I don't have nearly as many finished quilts as you - yet! :) - but already I'm beginning to find them to be a storage challenge. A chrome wire shelving unit, like the ones you have in your shipping area, seems to be working for me. I found one w the vinyl shelf protector sheets, so the bottom quilt on each shelf doesn't get damaged by the wires.

    Thanks for the look at the vault. It's fun to see how many of your quilts I can identify as they peek out of the stacks. Out of curiosity, and I hope it's okay to ask, will you be able to find a handy spot at the cabin, or at the Inn or PO, to relocate the vault when the time comes? You've given us some fun peeks into your studio, fabric storage and organization, etc. and I've always found those posts fascinating. Quilt storage is just the other side of the fabric storage coin. ;) Always interesting to see how others manage it. Thanks for the behind-the-scenes look.

    ReplyDelete
  16. If I were to ask a question like that - there would be No judging intended, just honest curiosity and because I needed ideas on how to store my own... LOL.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's exactly what I was thinking. Perhaps questioners are just looking for suggestions on how to deal with what they, themselves, face in their own homes. The lecturers among you may hear an implication in the tone used when the question is put to you, but to simply read it, I'm not hearing an implied criticism.

      Delete
  17. eewwwww people actually ASK what you do with your quilts???? ludicrous! a few bricks shy of a load i'd say....like whose business is it anyway??? unfortunately the internet gives some the impression that no filters are needed...

    ReplyDelete
  18. People ask me that all the time too. It's like I'm supposed to feel bad about it. I don't. I say, "Well, I have 5 kids and I give some away, and I will probably have grandchildren some day. I just like making them." Weirdo's, worry about yourself!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I Just look at them and love them! W

    ReplyDelete
  20. I was just asked the same question on Sunday as someone looked at my quilts stacked in several pieces of furniture and hung on racks, and draped over furniture. I just said, "you're looking at it" that's what I love to do and if my kids really want one and it is in the "stack, they can have it. When I die, it's thier problem to deal with fut for now, I am enjoying the process of making them and enjoying seeing them all over my house.

    ReplyDelete
  21. WOW! so many quilts - One of my fav authors showed me her collection of quilts - she had them layered in her guest bedrooms on the beds (literally tens of quilts deep on top of the beds!) Many of her other quilts were stored rolled around each other in a very deep closet. Some of the museums I have been to have their collections of quilts rolled widthwise on huge metal shelving units - I am sure the weight of the quilts is immense. I have a designated quilt cupboard for some of my larger quilts that my husband custom built for me (I filled it very quicky). This Christmas I got an older curio cabinet that is now filled with rolled quilts (didn't take long to fill that either!!! LOL) and my son made me a quilt ladder for the family room (also filled!!!). My lab at work is hung with all sorts of smaller quilts, my sofas and chairs have quilts draped on them...needless to say the beds all have quilts and still they keep coming! This year I finished nine quilts and gifted 4 of them - still no room for more but they keep finding their way out of my studio. I gifted several older quilts that I had been given to another quilter so more get shared. But seriously when someone asks me what I do with my quilts my response is ENJOY! I love making them!!!I so enjoy seeing all of your quilts and love how you spread the JOY!!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. This comment is from me, Alice Woodring. I was happy to see you write about your big vault of quilts today, because though I juat have a dozen or so , so far, I am already sort of overwhelmed with how to manage the space they require in my house. How to enjoy them and see them . So I appreciated the column from an organizational standpoint.

    ReplyDelete
  23. When someone asks me what I do with the quilts I make is ask 'why do you need to know?'

    This reminds me of the question(usually by males and usually trying to make fun of me) - how many sewing machines do you have? Or the more incredulous - You have HOW MANY sewing machines? Depending on the person, my response may be 'Why do you care? But if I know the person and their activities I may ask right back - how many fishing poles/golf clubs do you have? Or how many saws do you have? Most will look bewildered and say they don't know.... And then my response is - you don't know what you have but you need to know how many sewing machines I have..really?? Well, if it is that important to you I know how many sewing machines I have - 8. You need to go home, do inventory and report back to me. Oh wait. I really don't care how many poles/clubs/saws/salt and pepper shakers you have, you can have as many as you want. It makes for a hilarious conversation - at least for me... ;-)

    And sometimes I just answer 'a lot' or 'quite a few' or 'I keep them because I worked hard on them and I love them'. Everyone I love has quilts from me. If they want more, they can have more and they know that. They use them and respect them and don't use them in the garage to change oil or move furniture. I'm not trying to be mean when I answer, just in a funny way trying to point out how silly and intrusive their question feels to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A few years back I called my husband and told him I would be a little late coming home as I was going to look at a sewing machine, a Featherweight. He said, a sewing machine? What is wrong with your Bernina? Nothing, I said. Then he asked - Why do you need another one? To which I replied, It is sort of like the three air compressors you have!

      Delete
    2. I know, right?!?

      Delete
  24. Ask them what artists do with all their sculptures/paintings"

    ReplyDelete
  25. It was fun watching the video and saying I made that one and that one and that one. Oooohhhh I need to make that one and that one and that one. Keep making quilts Bonnie, don't be bothered about what you will do with them. Some things don't need to be justified. ;) Hugs to you.

    ReplyDelete
  26. About a month ago my husband said that some of our kids asked him about the two foot high stack of quilts on top of the batting box in my study. "What is Mom going to do with those quilts? Why does she make so many?"
    He told them, "She likes to make them. Now and then she gives one away."
    And that is as good a reply as any.
    I know that people who attend your classes and workshops are ecstatic at seeing your quilts - so keep doing what you love!! More power to you!!

    ReplyDelete
  27. I get asked that question a lot too. It turns out that they want a quilt, want to buy it, or are wondering if I would make one for them. I make quilts because I enjoy the process of making them.

    ReplyDelete
  28. It isn't the amount of quilts that I have, most have been given away, but the question I get all the time--why do I need so much fabric?! My answer, I have a room full of fabric because I want to be able to sew til the day I die! I never had to work outside the home, so before my hubby retired two years ago, he told me to buy as much as I wanted, just for this reason. I am glad I did! The way the price of fabric has gone up in the last ten years has been shocking. You do you, and I do me---everyone is happy!

    ReplyDelete
  29. I hope someday to have a stack of quilts to the ceiling. I love seeing stacks of quilts. Antique quilts are my favorite. Enjoyed seeing yours. Keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I converted my gun cabinet to store some quilts...My son tells people they can buy them on ebay....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elaine- I Like that you did that with a gun cabinet. I saw one for sale recently, that I thought of buying, but I would put my long guns in it for now. But, buying one and converting it would be a wonderful idea!
      Thanks for that.

      Donna
      Kasilof, AK

      Delete
  31. I don't understand why people feel they have the right to ask you anything they feel like asking and know everything about your personal life just because you are a wonderful quiltmaker that does so much for the quilting community. I truly believe they don't think before they ask. I am sure sometimes you would like to say this is my life and not yours.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I don't get asked what do I do with my quilts, but it gets on my nerves when someone I'd cutting my fabric and wants to know what am I making! Don't like that at all....lo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I get asked that question also. My reply "I have to have a reason?"

      Delete
  33. My least favorite question:"Who's that one for?" Sometimes I know, sometimes I don't--but right now, I'm just creating! :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. What do you do with all those quilts - the answer is simple - I do the same thing you are doing - I look at them!

    ReplyDelete
  35. I am so friggin excited to come to your lecture tomorrow and class on Thursday in Louisville. Bring all of those quilts. I want to see every one of them!

    ReplyDelete
  36. What a great conversation! For the first twenty years quilts were made for gifts, donations, birthdays and a couple for the bed. In the last three years the quilts have started to accumulate with seasonal themes. Now i have a storage issue for the quilts that are the opposite season. Quilts are in the living room, dining room, bedrooms and basement sewing space. Each child has at least three special quilts. Hubby has two throws for his chair. The gift and donation quilts have also continued to be given. Sometimes I wonder when enough will be enough. It isn't yet though because I still have a nice accumulation of scraps that are calling to be sewn into quilts!

    ReplyDelete
  37. What a lovely chore. I do not think it is a question I would ask you. But if I did it would be me looking for ideas of what to do with mine. There are many I made, not as gifts, but because I wanted the challenge. I have a dozen (or more) on one bed. I often think "Who will love them as much as I have?"

    ReplyDelete
  38. I don't think you should feel judged, Bonnie. I think most people ask because quilt storage is a problem for them, and they hope you have a great system that will work for them as well.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Bonnie you are richly blessed. Your job and your passion are one in the same. Not many people can say that. Enjoy your journey to the fullest. There will be a day to decide on the quilts. It's your legacy it will find a place in this world. You are very generous with donations and your time. That someone needs to figure out their own space. Those quilts are like your children and extension of your life. Treasure them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terri, This is a wonderful way to see Bonnie's life.

      Delete
  40. Try not to let the question bother you. And please don't let people giving unsolicited storage suggestions upset you. Just remember that the suggestions may help another quilter with their storage issue.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Well, there are two ways to look at the question. One is purely practical, as in "How do you store all of those quilts?". Until recently, I didn't have more than enough for each bed to have a couple and another couple for each sofa, chair and love seat. But now I do, and I'm wondering, what do I do with these?? Where can I put them? I do have a suggestion on that, because we recently had a built in cabinet put in an odd shaped space during a remodel. Shelves, maybe 8" apart and 2 or 3 feet deep, as long as space allows, would let you have quilts folded and stored without having to move all of the others on top of it. Deeper is a bit harder, you need to be careful on how they are folded; you'd need to go long and narrow so that you don't have hiders behind others. You've surely got a lot of quilts, and they are so heavy that you are right, they can't be hung for storage. I can't imagine needing to pack a few up, only to find that they are near the bottom of a stack - and realizing that all of those on top needed to be moved off of the one(s) you need, and then put back into a pile. Oh, my back!

    Second, the person asking might not be thinking about having to keep them on hand so that they can be used for classes. Perhaps she (or he) thinks of them being finished and sent off to some place or other, gifted or donated. That might work for "us", but as they are needed for your job, that's not going to work for you.

    Thanks for the peek into your vault - I see some of my favorites and some I don't recognize at all!

    ReplyDelete
  42. When I am asked why I make so many quilts, I just smile and say "It keeps me out of bars." Then keep smiling while they try to figure out if you're serious.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I love seeing your piles of quilts in the closet. I have my own piles. And no you can never have too many quilts!!

    Some friends and I were on our way to the next town over for lunch today and were commenting on how green things are. Here in Nebraska for gosh sake. Usually by this time in the summer things are starting to look a little brown.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I loved seeing your quilt vault and saw some of the quilts for the classes that I'll be taking with you in Bedford. Safe travels!

    ReplyDelete
  45. If I didn’t make more quilts what would I do with all my stash??? Finished quilts are so much easier to store, use, or give as gifts. Who would want a pile of stash as a gift??? (Excluding all you quilters who would gladly take stash as a gift.).

    ReplyDelete
  46. I imagine that there are various reasons people ask....but I imagine most ask out of interest and curiousity....with no critical or bad intentions in mind...I'm not a quilter but greatly enjoy your blog and often think about how much work is involved in what you do.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Thank you for your openness. We love reading all about everything. Good luck with your sorting and packing. I will be meeting you in Louisville this week. Since I am traveling over 5 hours, I will be at the lecture and all 3 classes. I’ve been doing my share of packing also.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I too have often been asked, "What do you do with all of your quilts?"
    My favorite reply is "What ever I want." ;)

    ReplyDelete
  49. Love what Mary of 'Country Threads' says she will do with her quilts. At her funeral, she will have them hanging on the back of pews. Whatever pew you sit at, you get that quilt. Mine will probably end up in a yard/garage sale. It doesn't matter to me because I plan to be in Heaven. Patty McDonald

    ReplyDelete
  50. I think that is a... (was going to say dumb)...question that only people who don't make anything ask. Your point is well taken. This is your job, you need examples. Your quilts need to wait around for their next outing. I haven't really decided what to do with my quilts, though I have been giving more of them away lately. Still there are those that I want to keep for now. My point is that I like making the quilts. What I do with them isn't important now.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Love your cutting table, Bonnie. Where did you get it? I'll have to start looking at auctions, garage sales and junk shops! Don't worry about your quilts, just have fun and keep making them!!! Thanks for all you do!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  52. I would only ask a question like that to find out how you store your many quilts!

    ReplyDelete
  53. I get asked this question all the time too and I answer that in my lifetime I will enjoy them and when I am gone, there will be instructions on how I wish them to be distributed. I make quilts because sewing them makes me happy, hence the reason why I have a spare bed piled high with over a hundred quilts of different sizes. I love going through them from time to time, discovering a quilt or quilts I can't remember making, cuddling them, refolding them, reorganizing them. Many of them such as the selvedge quilts (over 30 of them), I wonder what will become of them but for now they are mine to enjoy. I love your quilt vault, wild and free !

    ReplyDelete
  54. I'm sorry you get irritating questions like that. But thank you for the glimpse into your quilt vault. It was beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I Let my Grandchildren choose one to sleep with when they come. We had 8 Quilts out in the tent this last weekend. I tell nosy people that I save my quilts for my family to fight over when I am gone. I have 3 Granddaughters slleping inder my Quilts this week at Grandma Quilt Camp.

    ReplyDelete
  56. I told one nosey gentleman that I like to throw all the quilts on the floor and then roll in them like Scrooge McDuck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Debbie, thank you for the laugh! That's a cute answer! I needed that today!

      Delete
  57. Time! Can I buy time to make more. I just get itchy if I don't create. Just tell them I love them all,,. And run my hands I them. Feels so good!

    ReplyDelete
  58. I have found it very interesting to read all the responses here. The one I had not considered was that people asking this question often want to have one, buy one, or have one made for them. I too get this question all the time. I agree with the person that talked about what do painters do with all the paintings they create. For me the fun is in the making and in playing with all the color. I give away at least half my quilts and display a lot of them throughout my house. I don't find the question intrusive. I take it as curiosity.

    ReplyDelete
  59. I get asked this all the time and I do agree with you that it is rather a rude question. Quilting is my sanity! Can’t stifle the creative bug! I need to read everyone’s comments and come up with a good come back..... 😊

    ReplyDelete
  60. If a quilter kept all the quilts she/he made, yes the house couldn't hold them all. I have kept a few, but the vast majority of what I make are for charity. Either to our local Linus chapter or for a patriotic charity supporting veterans. Also I give quilts sometimes as gifts, but there are other quilters in my extended family, I don't want to step on their toes.
    There's plenty of inspiration on Quiltville and from other sources to keep me busy until I can't sew anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  61. People ask me the same thing and I love my quilts there is a lot of work and its good to keep for awhile. Don't feel bad I always get a feeling that they want one for free. Most of them I have given away to my family I not made one for myself yet but I'm working on it. I love looking at people quilts they inspire me. Your quilts are beautiful keep them until your retire and then again you may not want to part with and I can't blame you they are beautiful

    ReplyDelete
  62. Dresden is a fluffy kitty. No wonder he likes to stay inside on the tile.
    I have two cornish rex kitties and they would love to be outside in the heat, but no they cannot go outside ever. They do have sunny patches and plenty of polar fleece.

    I love your quilts. You need them now. Well, I think that is a silly question to ask. I would keep my answer pretty simple, perhaps you can say they serve as a huge quilt cozy for your house over the winter months, and show them which one is used for the front door.
    I do save many of my quilts that are personally meaningful for me. I give many of mine away to people I love.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I enjoy making quilt tops for my quilt ministry and over the years have donated at least 15-20 tops per year.If I had to store them, I have no idea where or how that would be accomplished. I am grateful that you shared your closet full of quilts because it is your business and livelihood.Many blessings for all you share.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I store some of my quilts on the beds in my extra bedroom under the current quilts and rotate them. Others come out to coordinate with the different seasons, some hang, others are folded and others are flung over furniture. Someone suggested making a tablecloth quilt for each month: new project!
    I make quilts because I want to and give them away or keep them because I want to! You go and do want you want to Bonnie. You are such a refreshing blessing to this Quilting world. You love your work and I love visiting with you daily. “Do what you can, want to, and let the others just talk” Frysan quote.

    ReplyDelete
  65. I rescue vintage quilts from estate sales all the time as I am afraid they will end up in a dumpster. When asked why I buy them my answer is - Because I can.

    ReplyDelete
  66. What difference does it make what you do with them? For now it is your job to make quilts and inspire others so they have a purpose! I just love making them! Someday someone will enjoy them more!

    ReplyDelete
  67. I live with my eldest daughter and we both quilt and LOVE it. At 82, I love to quilt ... I think it keeps your mind young and fresh to use it in such a manner. We both get the same questions everyone else seems to get ... We keep them. We sell them but mostly we LOVE them and give SOME away when we want to ... It's the joy of creating and I hope we never stop. I LOVE quilting. My daughter knows that when my time here has passed ... keep what she wants and share the others with whomever she wants or not. My youngest daughter, an artist, not a sewist loves our quilts and always wants more. Quilting = happiness and peace.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Maybe the question about your quilts was totally an innocent inquiry, not meant to be anything more, for we all know what a wonderful teacher you are and stand in awe of all you do. Like so many things in life, you don't need to respond. You have given us all a gift of not only quilting but life itself. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Hi Bonnie--I was hoping you had an good answer because that is what I am asking myself! What can I do with the quilts I want to keep? Get a bigger house??? Maybe when my old plaster ceilings fall down (next earthquake), I can get some vertical storage....

    I don't have your excuse that this is my job. But it is my therapy.

    ReplyDelete
  70. I don't have enough finished ones yet but I was asked and I said I rotate - one for me, one for my son (age order) and one for my daughter then one for me etc! Then the odd secret Santa has a little one. Can't wait to make more though!

    ReplyDelete
  71. WOW Bonnie!
    There are a lot of comments today on your blog. I can play devil's advocate, like I do so much of the time and look at things/questions from many avenues. Just maybe, the person who asked, may have just been wondering, as she could tell from your blog/books/lectures/ classes, etc that you must have an enormous amount of quilts, and she was just curious as to how you stored them. THAT would be my query, not as to what you were going to do w/ each of them in the future.

    I kind of know what goes into packing quilts for a quilt show/class, etc; as when I worked at the quilt shop we had a resident in house certified Judy Neimeyer paper piece instructor that lived in Alaska during the summer months and wintered in Ohio. SO, She had to bring all her quilts w/ her every year for her teaching in the summer. She put on a mini trunk show during even a one day class/judy studio, let alone a 2 or 3 day workshop. She would have loads of quilts, and some of them we kept at the shop during the summer, many laid out on beds, in layers at my boss's house. This at least cut down some on the number she would bring from her house to the shop each week or every couple of days.

    So, just keep making quilts and enjoy each of them, finished or in stages, along the way! You do great and wonderful things for others to enjoy! Thank You, Bonnie!

    Donna
    Kasilof, AK
    Where it is a little cooler today, and not near as windy as yesterday!

    ReplyDelete
  72. Bonnie. When I read that you get asked that question, I understood why it was asked. I have thought it myself!! But my first real quetion was, she did all of these herself????? I was shocked at the quilts you had in that book, and that was a few books ago, and now I know you have and did make them all. Not only make these quilts, you design them too!!! Lady, you are a rock star!! I love it, knowing you are out there, making magic and teaching others to do the same. Yes, you need these tools, the quilts, the space to create, the energy to keep it going - how you do that to amazes me! You do not have to answer to anyone. EVER. You do what makes you happy, and this does. And we all enjoy it to, because you have a whole lot of people who love to read you blog. And love to look through your books, I know I do. love the insperation.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Late to the comment party, but: when I'm asked what I'll do with "all this fabric" I reply, "I'm going to own it." You are welcome to adopt that for your quilts, Bonnie. Years ago DH and I had a friend who had a significant antique doll collection (and other collections, too). She joked that her end would be "Funeral on Friday, auction on Saturday!" [Knowing her great good humor (despite debilitating hip/knee problems) that was likely exactly what her sons did after her death.]

    ReplyDelete
  74. I love your quilt vault!! Oh, how much fun it must be to see all those lovely quilts! Shelving in there might help so you didn't have to dig through them, maybe you could put that on hubby's to-do list. :)

    ReplyDelete

Did you know that ad space on this blog provides for all of the free patterns and free mysteries and challenges at no cost to you? Without ads, this blog would not be possible.

Thank you for understanding the many hours that go into this blog every day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. :)