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Saturday, September 18, 2021

The Great Quilt Relocation Trip -


This happened yesterday.

A trip to Wallburg to meet with my realtor friend, and get more movement going on getting the old house ready to put on the market now that our renter has moved out.

And I have a van completely loaded bonnet to boot with quilts.

Isn't this what it's like when someone has been quilting a lifetime?


There may be some here that you recognize.

I have put off this task for months and months because it wasn't imperative that I move everything all at once.

But with getting the house show ready (There are some repairs to happen before we actually list it - so it will be a few months yet.) it's time.  I need to deal with this.

And frankly, this is one of the hardest tasks for me to deal with.

So many quilts. Too many quilts?  Is there such a thing?


The first three piles are in -


All the way to the tail gate.

We arrived home last night around 9pm-ish.  It was late. And dark - after a full day of working at the Wallburg house.

Not shown - the Hubster filled his pickup bed with tools and other things, and also pulled a full trailer with the master bedroom bed and other furnishings that we are swapping out - things I want here.

It was a big grueling day.


And this morning? Yep - it's still all there.

*sigh*

Today I will begin to unload and sort.  Some to gift away.  Some to donate. Some I want to keep - oh too many I want to keep!

At this stage of my life I am thinking I should have focused more toward miniature and small quilts!  (But let's face it - they don't sew up enough fabric fast enough. I'd be drowning in more stash!)

Many of the vintage quilts I'm going to sell.  I'll start with a stack at the inn that retreaters can go through - prices slashed to sell.

And then there is my collection of pink depression glass! *rolling eyes*  There just may be a priced to sell display shelf at the inn too.

I don't have the time or desire to rent a booth in an antique mall to offload this stuff.  I do not want to just give antiques to the Goodwill.

This is SO SUPER HARD for me.  I do not understand minimalism.  So minimalists need not comment! LOL!


Packed to the gills.

I think it would be easier to just have a bonfire.

I'm just kidding of course.

Or maybe I'm not!


I pondered all of this stuff while refilling my coffee station drawer with pods.


Something about placing them this way makes me feel more in control of my life. LOL.

I have the weekend.  And It's time to get started.

What I want to know is this - does ANY of this over-abundance of quilts, fabric, machines, books, patterns, scraps, stuff make you a bit anxious??

Like knot in the pit of my stomach and not wanting to deal with it kind of anxious.

I LOVE designing quilts.  Every day I want to cut up the fabric and put it together and see where it goes - and what I can do with it.  

I AM NOT STOPPING.

And I just MAY leave all of my quilts for my family and friends to deal with after I'm gone. Because then I won't care.

But storage is a problem.  Space is a problem.

And oftentimes I feel more and more overwhelmed as if I put my whole life into quilts instead of really living.

But then I remind myself of the walks and hikes, the togetherness with other quilters and friends - and no.  Not just the quilts.  There is so much more to embrace.  And I am.


Maybe Ivy has more answers.

In the mean time:
I want to thank everyone for the tremendous response to the PDF pattern release of September Sky and Spider & The Fly!

Thank you thank you thank you!

I have placed BOTH patterns in the digital pattern section of the Quiltville Store at 25% off the regular price with no coupon needed.

The introductory pricing is good through 9/30/21 and will revert back to full on 10/1/21.

If this is your first time downloading digital patterns from my store to a computer click HERE.

If you intend to download to an iPhone/iPad click HERE.

Save even more!

Purchase BOTH in the September Sky Pattern Bundle and save an extra discount! 

This bundle is a limited time only offer, and will be retired on 10/1/21.  So hurry!

And while I have you here - I want to remind you of this little Gift-Away for you and a friend!
I will be gifting away a September Sky Pattern Bundle AND a Facets of black color roll from Cotton to Quilts

And our winner gets to choose a friend who will also receive the pattern bundle and a black color roll!

Fabric prizes must be shipped to a USA address.  If you are outside of the USA and win, you may have the fabric prizes shipped to a friend within the USA who can forward them on to you.

Head on over to the release post for more info and get your entry in.  We'll be drawing for our winner next Saturday, September 25th, 2021!


I have also marked my Appalachian Autumn PDF pattern at 25% off through September!

The sale price will remain through September 30th, and revert to full on October 1st, 2021.  Don't miss out!


Quiltville Quote of the Day 

Never give up on the person you are becoming-
There is still so much yet to grow into!

And that includes the struggles of what to do with too many quilts!

Have a great weekend, everyone - I'll have an update for you on Monday.


 

97 comments:

  1. Taking pictures of all those quilts over the railing with the help of retreaters! There is always the mill building for the Bonnie Hunter Quilt museum . LOL Do you have a total count on your quilts, Pat Sloan just counted all of hers recently.

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  2. WOW!! My first thought literally was, "That's ALOT of quilts!!" And, yes, I do recognize quite a bit of them! I would definitely let the family and friends fight over some! That is also a great idea to have some for the retreaters to have some eye candy as well!! And of course Ivy gave me a chuckle! Today is catching up on the weekly house chores, and I am sewing Happily Scrappily Irish together in rows! I love this point of the process, it means I am close to being finished with it and can move on to the next! Happy Saturday everyone!

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  3. I understand your need to downsize and the frustration of it... such a huge project... I did have a thought about the quilts... you might consider adding a sale tab to your blog or store to sell some of them to your faithful quilty friends ... or a one day auction... I am sure you have picture of all of them already, so it would only be a matter of consolidating them to one area and pricing... just a thought.

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    1. That is a great idea. Give your quilty followers a chance to purchase a original "Bonnie Hunter Quilt". I would be first in line to purchase one. When I saw the quilts I wanted to grab a bunch of then, wrap myself up in a overstuffed chair and take a nap.

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  4. Two years ago I vowed not to make any more big quilts. How many have I made since then? At least four with another starting the end of this month. And the next mystery quilt coming up. Resistance is futile.

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  5. Do you have a consignment shop near by? They sell your stuff and keep a small percentage!

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  6. Having grown up using a minimum of 3 quilts on the bed in the winter, I would love to have had the choice from your collection. You do not have a deadline to thin out the heard, so don't let it get to you. Have you thought about auctioning some of the quilts you are letting go of to donate the funds to a special charity dear to your heart?

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  7. I feel your pain!! I love to quilt - have a LOT that are all sizes - we are downsizing to move to Florida from indiana - don't need very much in Florida - have it already furnished. My husband LOVED auctions and antiques - and he has a 40 x 24 barn full of tools, and another barn 48 x 32 - mostly full of other things. Guess we are going to have an auction in the next few weeks.

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  8. I love your quilts...and have made many of them, as you have led us...it is great therapy, and I feel there is great value in that!! What a lovely stack you have there, with lots of fun memories of this fabric, and that fabric...and when you made them, and with whom. AWESOME!!

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  9. The quilts simply do not get 'wore out' like they did in Grandma's day. They are carefully placed and folded again and again stacked to show the beauty but 'unused'. So the collection builds and builds and we think to share/gift with family, but the family state they prefer the soft fluffy blankets that the big box sells for $5.00. It then comes down to donating to charity or gifting to groups, such as the volunteer fire department who can raffle quilts for funding. .
    Bonnie Hunter you have an plethora of quilts because it has been your job, your peace, your sanity for decades - so quilt on and continue to enjoy the peace while in your cozy cabin.

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  10. Your post comes as we are cleaning the house of my husband's youngest sister who died this month. The family is sorting items of sentimental value from the non-keepers.
    I can offer a suggestion for the many beautiful quilts. Perhaps you have a cause you want to support such as the American Cancer Society in memory of your brother. A quilt could be raffled for fund raising events. Your wide range of friends and supporters would make a raffle very successful.
    Good luck with your downsizing.
    Connie
    c_s_wolfe@yahoo.com

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  11. there is only one word to keep uppermost when downsizing...ruthless...right after that comes reality....have fun!

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  12. I feel your pain regarding the quilts. I love making them, I don’t like letting go of them. I want them to go to those that will love 💕 them as much as I do. My granddaughter who lives in CT was here for a visit and she chose one to take back to her new home.
    I’ve told my hubby, after I gone, to let my family choose first. Then lay them on the church pews at my memorial and ask those that want one to take one. The rest to be donated to charity for raffles to raise money for a cause. Meanwhile, I will switch them out monthly and enjoy my works.

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    1. I have a similar plan and have let my family know. I also have places designated for my fabric stash.

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    2. Peggy, I love your plan.

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  13. Your beautiful quilts are just one record of living your best life! The creativeness, enjoyment, skill, and generousity that embodies each quilt is a reflection of who you are! Your quilts are a treasure! Take your time in deciding what to do with your quilt treasures and then do what feels right for YOU! I love the idea of a previous poster of a picture of each quilt over the railings of the Inn.

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  14. I feel your pain regarding the quilts. I love making them, I don’t like letting go of them. I want them to go to those that will love 💕 them as much as I do. My granddaughter who lives in CT was here for a visit and she chose one to take back to her new home.
    I’ve told my hubby, after I gone, to let my family choose first. Then lay them on the church pews at my memorial and ask those that want one to take one. The rest to be donated to charity for raffles to raise money for a cause. Meanwhile, I will switch them out monthly and enjoy my works.

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  15. Your quilts are beautiful! How about hanging some of your quilts and having them for sale so retreaters can purchase? Have a drawing for your retreaters and the lucky winner gets to take home one of your quilts? I totally understand with the downsizing. I have a whole house full to downsize. I'm not into the minimalist thing either. I did an auction one time and was so disappointed with what the bidders were bidding, and for what dollar amount I ended up with for everything sold. It would have been better for me to have donated my stuff because my heart just sank. Charity auctions can bring in lots of money so that may be a better way to go on auctions. Keep us posted, and enjoy the weekend.

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  16. I feel your pain. The need to make quilts is all-consuming for me too. But I also hate to see them just sitting on a shelf unused and unloved. My solution is to make them with scraps and thrift store fabrics to keep costs down, and then donate them to fundraisers and worthy causes. This makes it a triple win. I get the fun of creating them, the charity gets the benefit to continue their outreach, and a needy person gets the joy of receiving my gift of love.

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  17. I am sure many of us would love to have one of your quilts. Maybe once in awhile you could do a giveaway on your blog. I agree with Roxann from Texas you have such a gift and who could we call up on our devices for our quilty pleasures almost every day and to see our favorite quilter and her funny pets.

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  18. To me that looks like a van load of a life with so many blessings. You are able to do what you love!

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  19. Here's my thoughts about quilting: humans are driven by creativity to make things. Not all, but many are. Pre-Industrial Revolution, many of those people were able to make a living by being makers, but now that goods are made in factories, 'making' is a hobby/luxury for most. With quilts, the finished product is at least tangibly useful and practical. Even a worn/dated/ugly quilt can still keep someone warm. It's one of the many things that attracted me to quilting in the first place - quilts are useable objects, not frivolous dust-catchers.

    So no, an abundance of fabrics and quilts doesn't make me anxious, at least as long as I don't let the beast get too out of control. Now, piles of other junk and clutter and 'what do I do with this' stuff does make me anxious. If I figure out how to solve THAT problem once and for all, I'll tell you and everyone else and make a bunch of money. ;)

    Many of your quilts feel like old friends to your readers. Just seeing the edges of several 'familiar faces' peeking out of those stacks made me smile.

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  20. Downsizing is ak8n to surgery! Circumstances such as age and illness in the family have forced this decision upon me. Choice is to allow family to decide when time comes and/or just continue to pare away as I see another downsizing further coming. There are not easy answers. Gift them when possible.good luck with your decisions.

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  21. Hi I’ve been piling up “extra” quilts I have and going to donate to the new refugees from Afghanistan. They came here with nothing but what they were wearing. I sure they would. Love to have a homemade quilt

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  22. There can never be to many quilts. I store mine on 2 twin beds (still have one bed with only 3 quilts on it for guests). I like to keep them flat. Like you Bonnie, I have been quilting for .......quite a few years & have a collection. I won't part with the "Bonnie Quilts" that I have made from your patterns. The rest I don't WANT to part with. It is a dilema but, a happy one. I have a couple of grands & my daughters who are my "quilt people" meaning they want whatever I make. They can duke it out after I'm gone. Like you, I won't be around to monitor what happens to my precious quilts. BUT, I have told them if I find out they went into a garage sale, "I will come back & haunt them" LOL! Bonnie, don't agonize over your lovely collection. Embrace them & love on them & just find a place or places to store them. And please whatever you do, DON'T ever stop making them. The quilters of the world depend on you for inspiration & your yearly mystery. Can't wait for that. My quilty year revolves around your annual mystery. Love you & can't wait for Halloween.

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  23. Just because minimalism is the new buzz word does not mean you need to follow if you do not want to. Do what is right for you and your family. PS I love making large quilts and wall hangings/table runners just do not do it for me.

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  24. Love your quote of the day. I've found that it so true. Love that you do this for all of us. :)

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  25. Marie Kondo (on Netflix?) was pretty inspirational for me and she made it seem so easy to get rid of everything. Are there quilt museums for some of your quilts? And I'm sure any "Bonniac" would also pay to have a quilt celebrity's quilt she actually made. :)

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    1. I am sure there are museums that would like a quilt or two.

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  26. Enjoy you abundance!

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  27. I agree, many charities hold online auctions, our Girl Scout council just had one to raise funds because of covid and a flood at the office/girl activity center to make up the difference from insurance and to fix things at our camps. it was very successful. You would also get a nice tax donation. And I agree to sell some at the inn, maybe only one or two each retreat group so they will last through many retreat groups.

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  28. I also agree with a blog gift away, maybe quarterly, or monthly, depending on how quickly you want them to go. Also, you could gift them to quilt guilds you know so they can raffle them off and you will be supporting the craft you love!

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  29. I feel you! Also trying to downsize and declutter. Hard and painful and yes, it makes me anxious.

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  30. How about giving away some quilts to randomly selected winners? Folks who will never be able to come to your lovely Quiltville Inn to share in the option that the visitors have. I have decided to enjoy the quilts I make (large nap quilts and miniatures) until I go to the great quilt shop in the sky. My husband has instructions to let family and close friends choose first, then members of my quilt group(s), then the guild if they agree to auction them off for charity. If he ever sends any of them to Goodwill, I will haunt him for the rest of his life.

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  31. All those places you went and all those people you met is part of really living too.... you have those memories.

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  32. Oh Bonnie please consider a way to sell your too many quilts you thin out to earn money. Then donate that money to a helpful cause that speaks to your heart. Or help a food pantry or homeless people. Or habitat for humanity that builds homes for people with limited income. My first blog to you. Carol

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    1. Everyone has ideas on how *I* should sell and donate. But I feel these should go to family first. Then friends. And then donate. The hours and cost that I have in all of these does come to mind. This is like giving away my children. One just does not "donate" their children.

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    2. But sometimes one thinks about donating her children! LOL

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    3. Bonnie, I think your plan sounds perfect. Family, friends, donate. They are made with love and there's no amount of money to gain from love. I'm starting to accumulate quilts too and give some to family and friends, but I haven't been able to even give away my "Bonnie" quilts. I love Ivy, she looks like our cat that we had for 22 years before she went to kitty heaven.

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  33. I don’t worry too much about what will happen to my “stuff”. If I outlive my quilting sister she’ll be happy to take it. Otherwise, it will be a wonderful estate sale. Y’all come.

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  34. Regarding your boat load of quilts. This year we had fires tornadoes, floods etc. People may need something to wrap up in when they have nothing. Just a nickles worth of thought. Thanks for what you do everyday!

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  35. I think it's normal to sometime feel a moment of almost panic about the things we've collected and the ways we've chosen to spend our time. I ask myself a couple of questions. First, what else would I, could I, "should" I really-- realistically-- have been doing with that time? And second, did I enjoy spending my time as I did? Did it make me happy (without hurting anyone else)? If we love what we're doing, we're doing well. How better to spend our lives than doing what we love?

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  36. You could leave to your son's. Wouldn't a Quiltville tour of Bonnie Hunter Quilts be marvelous for future generations.Or even when you stop having retreats.

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    1. I hope Bonnie and Dave have retreats as long as they enjoy doing so. I was with a group of quilters for the last two days (and two more to go). Several of these quilters were from the "Naughty Room Quilters". We had a ball reliving and retelling retreat stories. So many ladies who have not yet been to "The Inn" are wanting to go!

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  37. I see those quilts as joy. Joyful hours designing, dreaming and making them.

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  38. Women's shelters usually get excited about gifts of quilts. They make their rooms look so homey.

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  39. I have told my children that when I pass away take the quilts you want and take the rest to my memorial service and hang them on the pew/chairs. Then everyone attending the funeral can pick one to keep, but friends have to attend to get one....lol....good way to get people to come....lol

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    1. Thanks for sharing your idea. I should put this in writing for my family

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  40. My mother was a poet. She published her first poetry book when she was 84 and her second at 86. When she died, no one wanted her poetry book collectioin, only the books she wrote. My grandmother collected pigs. Dear me, when she died at 99, no one wanted her pig collection, though we each took one for memory sake. And now I have a 55 year collection of fabric and way many quilts, antique and self made. When I die, I hope no one says...shame..all this fabric, she did not use up. I hope they say, she really really loved her fabric. As for quilts, really, I just want my own. The antique collections...I love less and less. Like Barbara Brackman said, I bought high and I sell low. The market has really changed that much. I will control my estate after I die, said no one ever. My mother gave away almost everything when she went into assisted living. She just kept her poetry books and hats on the walls. And,, so it goes. Best of luck xo

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  41. You didn't ask for advice, so I'm not giving any. You asked if there is such a thing as too many quilts? That's for you to decide. You asked if having too much of something makes a person anxious? Not I. You're a designer. Are designers of other commodities put on the spot about their output? I don't think so.

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  42. I think you have several good ideas on what you want to do with your quilts. Let the process percolate you don't have to rush. When we see how many books Stephen King has written we celebrate his passion and style-the same should be true of your quilts.

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  43. I have such empathy for you, Bonnie...not only about all the quilts, but about your pink depression glass collection. I started collecting it more than 50 years ago so I have quite alot of pieces. But my mother and father died a few years ago and mom's collection of pink depression glass exceeded mine. In addition she collected blue and purple carnival glass and a host of other things. I haven't been able to put their house on the market because I can't possibly store it all...I don't want to just donate it...and I am emotionally tied to it all. I'll be watching for your efforts and try to follow suit. Thanks for sharing and thank you for all the wonderful quiltalongs over the years. Blessings from nearby West Virginia.

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  44. This post is so timely for me as I am moving this weekend! OMG. So much work. So many quilts. So many boxes of "the stash." I can so totally relate, Bonnie!

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  45. Dear Bonnie, I hear the pain in you words. You and I have the same view on the subject. So follow your heart and do what makes you happy.

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  46. Of course only you can determine if you have balance in your life. From the outside looking in it appears to me that you give so much of yourself and your passion for quilting with your Quiltvillians as well as those of us who daily read your blog. You have a gift for being able to produce beautiful quilts quickly. I don't know how you get as much accomplished as you do! I am sure you feel stressed seeing all those quilts and having to make a decision but it will work out. You will get to the other side.
    Susan

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  47. I keep finding new reasons to gift quilts. So far I'm mostly keeping up with the production. New house, new job, new baby...

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  48. I’m sure if you put your quilts in your online shop they would sell easily and quickly. You have so many beautiful pieces that it would be very hard to part with them. Good luck with your decision.

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  49. Ms Bonnie: You seem overwhelmed. I hope today made things a little better. Downsizing cannot be fun. Take a deep breath, take a little walk, breathe some more. It won't go away, but little by little it will get accomplished. Thank you again for all you do for quilters. Prayers for you and yours.

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  50. Certainly give as many quilts to family as they will take. But...........eventually, family may not want or be able to take any more. Someone suggested donating to the Afghan refugees which I think is a great idea. I would also suggest donating to a homeless shelter or a women's shelter. I think either of those places would be very grateful to receive them. When you have so many of any item, it's time to release.

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  51. We have downsized through several moves over the years. But it has never occurred to me to include any of my quilts as part of any downsizing. They are my babies and my treasures. We can always make room somehow, some way for what is really important to us. Keep your babies .... you will know when the time is right to part with them.

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  52. I hear you! It's hard to see them all stacked on the floor. Family should get 1st pick. I would love a chance to buy one as a Quiltvillian. I need to do like my Grandma and label who gets which quilt, I'm still using them!!

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  53. Oh, what a treasure trove of beautiful quilts! The picture of Ivy is just beautiful, she is a lovely girl, and the picture is so clear, I love pictures of your pets, so that is always like dessert after a great meal! Thanks for posting these! I bought the combo September Sky package, it's such a great deal, thank you for making that available to us.

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  54. Bonnie, I feel the same way about all my quilts!!! I look around the house and see so many many of them........ I too am not a minimalist in any shape or form. I love your thought about miniatures -- honestly, I have stacks and stack of them also!!!!! I sew for my sanity, I sew to relieve stress. There is no way I'm stopping. Sewing quilts is what got me though the covid insanity. Many of the people I now consider my dear friends I met through quilting. What you aren't sure - store at the Inn or the Post Office. One of my favorite phrases....... "There are no quilt police". (just people who think they are). LOL.

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  55. You'll know what to do in the end. And those coffee pods - looked like an idea for a new quilt pattern haha - I often see things when out and about and think of quilts.

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    1. My thoughts exactly! Also Bonnie, if you decided to offer to none family, you should auction or sell tickets to regain your expenses. More fabrics are always needed! lol

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  56. I struggled when downsizing, and have to be pretty serious about what I plan to sew now. Many good organizations would be delighted for a raffle opportunity quilt as a fundraiser

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  57. Whatever decision you come to about the the quilts do it thoughtfully, don't rush it, you will want no regrets about that decision. No one needs to live a minimalist life if that doesn't suit them. I look around my home and see my Great grandmothers American Brilliant dishes( no one in the family wanted), my Grand mother divided dishes, my parents pictures, etc. You get the picture, a filled home. But it is a home not a house and these things give me pleasure. There are still a few things we let go at a garage sale cleaning out my Mom's home ( she lived there for 60 years and was a collector) that I regret, I won't want that for you.

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  58. Sorry if someone has already suggested these ideas. Facebook Market is good if you want to sell items. If you just want to send them to a new home. I highly recommend buynothingproject.org. It uses Facebook. You request to join the one in your area, I didn’t check Virginia. You take a picture, write your description, any requirements, like must be picked up by Tuesday. People respond and you pick someone, put the item on your porch and they pick it up. Easy peasy!

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  59. Bonnie, I agree with them goingto family friends first. Now whether you do that now or have a plan for after "your demise" is entirely up to your comfort level. Decideing now can make it easier- your sons seem to be "quilt people" when next they come to visit have them pick their favourites(maybe set an initial cap of 5 to 10?). decide if they get them now or later. then move on to your parents(send pics or maybe they have commented on favourites?, then let your siblings, nieces,nephews and finally friends. BUT do not forget to maybe set a few aside for future grandchildren. I have decided to make the photo albums online to document my quilting thru the years- to have record of those I have gifted and may gift in the future. Enjoy them while you have them. Also USE your favourite pieces of the depression glass! Everyday! not just on occassions! get rid of the rest

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  60. I hear you Bonnie! Follow your heart and do what you come up with. I have, at the age of 67, started giving a lot of my projects to the nursing homes for lap quilts and the health department for babies. I've started making sure I have pictures. As hard as it is to give some of them up, I know that I can't keep everything I'm making. And as one of the above said--I love fabric so that will be "the families' problem" someday! Love all you do for us Bonnie!

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  61. Two thoughts...a Red Cross crisis responder told me mailing a quilt to a fire station on the outskirts of a crisis area, at the time she was between the flood disaster in the Carolinas and the wild fires in CA, meant the quilt would be on a child by that night. Just ask that the station give it to a family that just lost their home or had to relocate to a shelter. The second suggestion is a tax deduction, donate a quilt to your local FFA Chapter or other youth organization for their annual auctions or raffle fundraisers. Just a thought.

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  62. Oh mercy do I understand what you are doing! We finally found a home - much smaller than wanted - after 5+ months of looking, everything in storage. I work on a very small budget. So my son and I have now been making the trip to storage and back. Sorting at storage - what will fit. Digging through storage. Replacing storage. Filling van. Unloading van. Finding the spots. Opening boxes that we don't remember packing. Plus we had an accident and lost stuff on the way here - 5+ months ago. Today my joints are screaming at me. So No to the offer of my parents who have a trailer to meet us at storage to load heavy stuff and drive back and unload . . .will it ever end?

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  63. So many of us love your quilts. Maybe a quilt gift away once in a while. It would be so awesome to own a genuine Bonnie Hunter quilt with a signed label. Now, that would be a gift to cherish forever. Just a thought.

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  64. You have become a well loved Quilter. While you may not see yourself as famous, I am sure that when people think of quilting your name is at or near the top. In time, these quilts will be extremely valuable. They should be exhibited in a a museum. Perhaps there’s a building nearby that you could purchase and begin your museum which will live on well after you were gone. If you are not wanting start a museum yourself, contact the Quilt Museum in Hamilton, Missouri. Years from now quilters in the new generation will find your quilts inspirational.

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  65. You have become a well loved Quilter. While you may not see yourself as famous, I am sure that when people think of quilting your name is at or near the top. In time, these quilts will be extremely valuable. They should be exhibited in a a museum. Perhaps there’s a building nearby that you could purchase and begin your museum which will live on well after you were gone. If you are not wanting start a museum yourself, contact the Quilt Museum in Hamilton, Missouri. Years from now quilters in the new generation will find your quilts inspirational.

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  66. You have become a well loved Quilter. While you may not see yourself as famous, I am sure that when people think of quilting your name is at or near the top. In time, these quilts will be extremely valuable. They should be exhibited in a a museum. Perhaps there’s a building nearby that you could purchase and begin your museum which will live on well after you were gone. If you are not wanting start a museum yourself, contact the Quilt Museum in Hamilton, Missouri. Years from now quilters in the new generation will find your quilts inspirational.

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  67. You have become a well loved Quilter. While you may not see yourself as famous, I am sure that when people think of quilting your name is at or near the top. In time, these quilts will be extremely valuable. They should be exhibited in a a museum. Perhaps there’s a building nearby that you could purchase and begin your museum which will live on well after you were gone. If you are not wanting start a museum yourself, contact the Quilt Museum in Hamilton, Missouri. Years from now quilters in the new generation will find your quilts inspirational.

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  68. Wow, just Wow. I have one question for you Bonnie, When was the last time you and your hubby went on a vacation just the two of you...unplugged?

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  69. I feel your pain and anxiety. I can’t even seem to discard my clothing from the 1960’s...much less the quilts I have collected, which I fully still intend to repair. They are little investments of somebody’s life...even if I never knew them. Quilting is personal. I love and collect all your books and Scrap Saver patterns. I admire minimalist thinking.....I really do...but it’s not who I am. I have three XL Ziploc bags of strings and selvedges, saved from 60+ years of sewing/quilting and a fairly large stash. I intend to keep sewing and dreaming and living until I die. There won’t be any regret buried with me of I can help it. Live the life you love NOW. They will figure out how to handle what you leave behind....because they love you. They may cuss a little while handling the estate....but that’s part of it. Keep up the beautiful work!!!💕

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  70. I know the pain well, last year I had to move on 30 days notice. I had lived in that home for 14years. I have been sewing and quilting for 50+ years. And I worked in a fabric store for 20 years (imagine my stash) It is all in storage except for a few small tubs of fat quarters and scraps. Almost a year later and I still live in limbo with no permanent home. Having that little bit here saves my sanity. Only 1 machine, my small modern Bernette for garments, but my sister in law has a vintage Riccar that I borrow for quilting. I have finished 2 crib size quilts and am working on the 3rd plus a queen size one that I just finished cutting from a kit.

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    1. I feel your pain. In similar situation.

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  71. Living your passion IS living! Hope you keep spreading the inspiration!

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  72. We downsized a few years ago. I had 2 garbage bags filled to the gills with scraps. I simply couldn't deal with them! I gave them to a friend to gift to her friend who does EPP and foundation piecing and doesn't have a lot of money for fabric. My friend washed all the scraps, pressed them and sorted them by color. When I saw them I almost wished I hadn't given them away! And then I thought of all the work she put into that. I've seen pictures of a few quilts made from my scraps and I'm so glad I gave them away!

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  73. downsized some when I moved, more importantly, I decided on a specific purpose for new quilts,(throw and larger go to the Church for donations, wall quilts I only keep what I like) but the point is that the past quilts are saved or gone, and the future is not adding to a unfocused pile, and that is giving me more freedom and enjoyment in my sewing.

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  74. Bonnie, you're a maker, and us makers gotta make! This is your craft, art, talent and joy...and yes I think it qualifies as living a (full) life!
    I do understand space constraints, tho. Maybe you can start just by sorting thm into keep, gift, and sell piles and sit with that plan for a while. Let your heart and mind have time to adjust to the idea of letting some go out in the world to be loved and cherished by your family, friends, and other quilters (aka friends you have yet to meet). 🙂

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  75. I understand how difficult it is to make plans for letting go of your quilts. I would suggest that you take pictures of them and compile the pictures in one of those "Snapfish" type books. That way you will have a pictorial record of your quilts and can look at them whenever you choose. It might take the sting out of saying goodbye to them. You could have multiple copies of the book made to give to your family as a keepsake of all of your creative work.

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  76. Someone may have suggested this above -- I think you should have an on-line auction for the quilts you will be selling. List 5 or 10 at a time, and let us (your faithful followers!) bid on the quilts we love the best. Add shipping to our bids, and you're set to go -- you already have a great relationship with the USPS! PS Just suggesting this because there are lots of us who would really love one of your pieces. PPS You could even donate proceeds to a project that teaches young people to quilt, perhaps.

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  77. My family has said..enough quilts for now but we will take more if you make them. This last week I sold two of my leader/ender projects with the note that all money goes to #gatherforgoats through Lifting Hands International. As much as I don't want to part with quilts this way I am helping others. That is what I am trying to focus on. Maybe you could autograph some of your quilts and sell them to help others. Just a thought. Thanks for all you do for others and the quilting community.

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  78. My mother was a quilter. And a sewist. Out of necessity, she actually spent more time sewing than quilting (13 children in my family and lots of clothes to make!); but, when she quilted, it was like watching art being made. She had a flare for it, made it look so easy. I only ever received one of her quilts - a simple patchwork, one of my favorites - and someone stole it. No kidding. Who steals quilts, huh? But, not having that simple patchwork is like not having a chunk of my mother. Quilts are important; they're a big deal. Keep on quilting, Bonnie. Make a plan for your creations in your Will - treat them as the priceless objects they are, and give others the opportunity to experience the kind of warmth that only a quilt can provide. Even a simple patchwork quilt.

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  79. Having just gone through the same process last year, I feel your pain and angst. We moved to our beach home which was already furnished. I still haven't gotten control of my bins of fabric and other craft materials. Let's not even talk about books. Clearly, minimalism is not my style. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other and eventually, it will all be in your rear view mirror.

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  80. I'm not a coffee drinker, so I thought it was odd that you have a coffee maker on top of your thread spool cabinet. And the spools are stacked in the drawer so neatly, with some inverted to make better use of the space. Oh wait. You say those are coffee pods, not thread??? Who'd have thought!! Thanks for giving me a good laugh today! On a serious note, I feel your pain and anxiety about having too much. Yet the new fabric keeps calling my name.

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  81. How many quilt do you have?

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