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Monday, March 11, 2013

Gluten Free & Me?


This has nothing to do with quilting ----but it does have to do with traveling with my quilting.

Those of you who have read me for a long time know that I have struggled with a lot of pain and inflammation in my hip joints over the past year, enough to stop me from power walking, and even causing me a tough time getting to the top of the driveway to retrieve the mail from the mail box.

I’ve had shots. I have had chiropractic.  I have had physical therapy.  I have tried pills and prescriptions.

I get regular massage.

I have tried EVERYTHING I can think of to deal with chronic pain and I’ve hit an impasse.

My neuromuscular therapist Rena told me about her daughter and her rheumatoid arthritis from a young age and how the presence of gluten in her diet caused things to get worse.  Removing the gluten from the diet caused great improvement.

Another friend who is gluten-free has a hubby who is an endocrinologist ---and we discussed the ONE treatment I have not tried for my pain.

Could it really be as simple as removing gluten from my diet?  Or at least – would it help with the inflammation?

I want to try.  I want to give it 30 days to see if there is improvement.  Arthritis ---Bursitis ---all those things that end in “-ITIS”  mean that SOMETHING is causing a reaction within the body to something the body is not happy with.

Of course, off the top of my head I know I need to avoid both in food AND in drink:
  • Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
  • Rye
  • Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
  • Wheat
 
Right now I’m kind of in shock over the things that contain gluten that I was unaware of:

  • Twizzlers licorice
  • Malt vinegar
  • Pickles
  • Blue cheese
  • Couscous
  • Hot dogs
  • Gravy powders
  • Root beer
  • Cold-cut meats
  • Canned baked beans
  • Pudding
  • Boxed soups
  • Soy sauce
  • Farina
  • Dry mustard powder
  • Salad dressings
  • Tabbouleh
  • Lower end brands of chocolate
  • Communion wafers
  • Sausages
  • Curry powder
  • Beer
Which food on this list do you find the most surprising?
 
I was surprised by pickles (I guess with malt vinegar) and Blue Cheese.  I will miss my blue cheese dressing!
 
I’m a bit freaked out.  I don’t know if I can walk this road.  I already blew it with dinner, we had canned baked beans and sausages.  With MUSTARD.  Which was made with dry mustard powder as one of the ingredients.
 
Tomorrow I start again.
 
Are you gluten-free? Do you have any hints for me?










152 comments:

Janet O. said...

My sister and my daughter are gluten free. I don't have specifics for you. I know they both have lots of websites to which they refer. This is affecting more and more people and there is a lot of help--even support groups. I'm sure others will have more help for you, but I feel your pain. Whenever I cook for a family party, I clear all of my recipe ingredients with my sister and daughter.

Colleen said...

I have not gone gluten free though may consider it. I have a friend however who had many of the problems you mentioned and she was a runner and active outdoorsman. Her intestinal issues were also horrible. She went gluten free and with in months was off all the meds she took and her symptoms all but disappeared. She did this 8 years ago when there were not as many gluten free products as there are today. Many restaurants cater to gluten free. Good luck. I want my dad to go gluten free I think it would help him alot.

dakotaessence said...

I'm totally grain (and sugar) free as of August 2012. I love it. It was quite a change/shift mentally and emotionally, but I feel SOOO much better. For encouragement, I highly recommend you take a look at wheatbellyblog.com and consider getting the Wheat Belly Cookbook. I have some great replacement 'bread' type recipes, and lots of other links for information and videos on going gluten and/or grain free if you'd like them. Mail me at dake misc at gmail dot com and I'll pass the info on to you.

Kate said...

If you do a LITTLE it's better than nothing, and gradually you make the changeover - let us know how it goes....

AJ (The Quilting Pot Podcast) said...

Bonnie, I thought about going "gluten" free. Jus so ya know, I am older than you. Maybe Gluten free Quilters should get together, share and support each other.

Karen - Quilts...etc. said...

I have thought of it but have not had the self control to do it. If a person goes gluten free basically the house has to be gluten free which means the family at home must go along with it - they can eat what they want when they are not with you - but at home - well it would be very hard to do I would think

swooze said...

Just try your best and keep raising awareness. Even lessening the amount could be a benefit.

*karendianne. said...

Hooked up with a dietician to go a similar route. Moving towards clean eating. What a lot to learn BUT the basics are still true. White food - no good. If is has a +7 day expiration date - no good. If its processed - no good. Fresh is where it's at. Think Vegan.

kt said...

I have been gluten free for several years now and it has made a huge difference for me. I do not find it that difficult at this point, though I do cook most things from scratch. Meat, veggies, fruits are all gluten free, unless they've been processed, as are most cheeses, except for blue cheese which uses bread mold. We eat a lot more rice now, as well as potatoes, quinoa, and kasha, and I use corn tortillas rather than flour ones. For snacking, popcorn, most tortilla chips, many potato chips, and the corn and rice Chex cereals are all fine. Kelloggs also makes a gluten-free version of Rice Krispies. La Choy lite soy sauce is made without wheat. Most prepackaged foods are out, but Progresso makes many soups without wheat, and Betty Crocker now has a gluten-free line of baking mixes. Most grocery stores have gluten free sections with baking mixes, crackers, cereals, etc. When making a white sauce, or something similar, you can substitute corn starch for the flour (1/2 as much corn starch as flour, and dissolve it in the cold liquid first)--I do this often.
I got the magazine Living Without for a while, which has lots of good recipes and suggestions, and from it I found a substitute for cream of mushroom soup--something I used to use a lot. We eat a lot more Mexican food now, though I make my own taco seasoning, since many of the packaged ones contain wheat. One thing we are really careful of is cross contamination, since I am the only gluten-free person in our house--I keep a separate jar of peanut butter for myself, and we always use a clean knife in the mayonnaise, and wash all measuring cups after using them for flour (with 3 kids, I do a lot of baking!) I also read labels carefully, though most list allergens prominently at the bottom of the ingredient list.
Feel free to email me with any questions. I also have some cookbooks I can pass on if you're interested--I have been gifted with more gluten free cookbooks than I need, especially since I mostly just adapt my old recipes to be gluten free.
Good luck with it!

Sally simplestitches said...

I look at it rather like learning a new quilt pattern. You may have to "un-sew" a few seams in the beginning but little by little you learn how do to it. If this is the thing that will help then go for it. Baby steps. Start with baby steps. Research the gluten free sites and go from there.

Jaayimee said...

Theres quite a few things on your list up there that are gluten free. Theres lots of miss information on the internet and lots of people are mis informed. Always contact the manufacture to verify. I've been gluten free for over 7 years. My whole house is gluten free because I'm so sensitive and if I'm glutened I know with in 20 mins. I eat hotdogs, baked beans, sausages, drink root beer occasionally and other stuff on the list. Good luck, it's not bad at all once you know what is ok and what isn't. I hope it works for your issues.

Margaret said...

You can get gluten freee communion wafers. If this is part of your spiritual practice, ask your priest/minister to get them for you. Likely you aren't the only one if it's a good-sized congregation.

:-)

Art4vr said...

Bonnie, I discovered my husband (and then all his siblings, it's hereditary) had gluten intolerance when I was researching food allergies and migraines (did not discover cause for my migraines yet) about 6 years ago. Usually, lactose intolerance goes along with it also. It is not so terrible now, there are a lot of new products. You cannot do it a little at a time. It has to be a complete break. It takes about 5 days for it to be totally out of your system. Gluten intolerance affects the auto-immune system- some people it is the arthritis and such, some thyroid, some MS, my husband it was anemia, infections, skin problems, stomach issues- his siblings it was different things. You have to read all the food labels- no modified food starch, maltodextrin, malt, wheat, barley, rye, spelt. Foods can be found- Bob's Red Mill makes gluten free oats, flours, etc. Schar makes breads and rolls that are vacuum packed to travel with. Eating out- grilled plain chicken, potatoes (nothing added), salads without croutons, McDonald's salads- grilled chicken, eggs cooked on a griddle without the pancakes next to them. I can give you a ton of recipes and flour ideas. You can also check a lot of the recipe sites- they are good. I make my husband cookies, muffins, cupcakes and freeze them individually so he always has something to take for lunch or travel. You can do it, get help. celiac.com, glutenfreegirl.com, glutefreegoddess.blogspot.com, allrecipes.com (GF) Local chapters of gluten free groups are a great source. Our local grocery chain, Wegmans has an orange g symbol on all of its products that are gluten free. Some restaurant chains post gluten free menus. Please email me if you have specific questions, lswanekamp1@gmail.com

MrsDoodlepunk said...

Gluten makes a HUGE difference for me. I am not obsessive, but I have checked out a few products that I like and use. Grey Poupon Dijon mustard is supposed to be GF. I know that shampoo commonly contains wheat protein, so I've gone "no poo" - go ahead, google it, I dare ya. The first week is the hardest but honestly my hair is now better than it was before. I cook my own food and rarely eat out, restaurants are horrible for trying to be GF but... that said, many are now offering gluten free options. I go the added few miles of eliminating dairy, meat and oils because they are all implicated in inflammatory diseases. When traveling, I get a room with a fridge and microwave and make my own meals with potatoes, Minute rice, canned beans and tomatoes and a couple spice mixes from home. It was very difficult at first but now it's the way I live. I've gone from being very sedentary and inactive to walking and being able to play the organ again. And of course, quilting!

Ann Parks said...

The Healthy Gluten-Free Life by Tammy Credicott is an excellent cookbook. I find it the most challenging when I travel and want something quick to eat. Good luck!

hiyacinth said...

My daughter is gluten-free; she has celiac disease. She eats fresh, organic whole foods--nothing prepared or processed including so-called "gluten-free" products. No dairy, but she does eat organically-raised meat. Lots of salads and fresh fruits and vegetables. She's very healthy looking now; people hardly recognized her after she was diagnosed and changed her diet.

Chatty Kathy said...

You should try things that might work for you. This does not seem to be something you can't do. Set a date; give it 4-6 weeks and see if it gives you relief. Thanks for sharing you're problems. Gluten-free is a "catch-all" phrase for lot's of ailments nowadays, so I would be a bit suspicious, but if it brings you relief, you have to give it a chance. Just me, saying, Kath

PeggyB said...

I found this article very interesting. It explains why so many people are having problems with gluten

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/wheat-gluten_b_1274872.html

Lois said...

I hope you'll keep us updated, Bonnie. My son's girlfriend must eat gluten-free and, so far, it hasn't been much of a problem whipping up a meal when they come for dinner. My son suffers from psoriatic arthritis so I'm hoping a gluten-free diet will help him too. It would be a difficult adjustment for me personally since I love my carbs.

Liz in KY said...

Two tips based upon experience:

1. Watch out for products that hide it in the chemicals in the bottom of the list. Minute Maid lemonade, for example, caused problems for me. They may have changed their formula by now...so read labels very carefully.

2. If you substitute gluten-free for gluten-containing products, be very mindful of calories and fat which may appear in some gluten-free products to make up for a change in the taste of the food.

I have arthritis as well as intestinal issues and both conditions definitely respond positively when I'm eating gluten-free and gradually worsen when I'm not eating gluten-free.

Good luck!!!

CindyB said...

Walmart has a great selection of glutton free foods, pastas, cereal, cake mixes, cookies, bread, boxed meals and cake mixes.

Maureen said...

I've been grain free for over 2 months now. My sister, a nurse, recommended the book Practical Paleo by Diane Sanfilippo to me and it has changed my life. I have autoimmune issues (asthma, hashimotos thyroiditis, pre-diabetes, vitiligo). This book has eating protocols for these and other diseases. You can actually read a good chunk of the book with the Look Inside feature on Amazon. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. Not to freak you out, but I also cut out dairy, nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers), legumes, nuts, seeds, eggs and all refined foods. Within 2 weeks my nasal congestion and pain in my hips and knees were gone. Most importantly my blood sugar levels have fallen. I've never had weight fall off me so quickly - 18 lbs. since the beginning of the year. I'm still struggling with keeping these things out of my food. I pretty much cook everything from scratch. Eating out is difficult though doable. Like you said, these foods cause inflammation and can manifest itself in different ways in different people. Once you've cut these foods out for at least 30 days, you can put some of them back in to see how you feel. Oh, and one of the best things is the tendonitis in my elbows and hands is gone so I can hand quilt for long periods of time. Yippee! I could go on and on. A good website is www.thepaleomom.com Don't let the "paleo" term scare you off. It is not a fad. This diet has been around for 30 years it just goes against current nutritional wisdom. Do the research and give it a try. What do you have to lose? Good luck!

Christi quilter said...

I hve never gone completely glutten free but have given up most things glutten and sugar. It sure did make a difference in how I felt. I was not aware that blue cheese has glutten in it so never gave it up. If you like it so much make your own rather than a store bought blue cheese dressing.
There is also this site for The Glutten Free Goddess that might interest you: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.ca/2011/02/gluten-free-pizza-crust-my-new-recipe.html
Good luck living mostley glutten and sugar free might be enough!

ET said...

Gluten is one possibility but another is sugar - in particular high fructose corn sugar. Sugar in all forms causes inflammation. Sugar is in everything too! Ketchup, dressing - anything low fat usually has more sugar than the regular version. I know when I totally avoid all sugar (and there are a lot of names for sugar!) I have MUCH less inflammation in my joints and overall feel better. If you follow a diet that is free of processed foods, eat fruits, vegetables, meat, good fats (olive oil, coconut oil) avocados, nuts - you will be sugar and gluten free. Many people in Syracuse, NY area are following a face book page 'A Month Without Sugar" and we started Feb. 1st - many of us are still doing it and feeling better.

Carolzonie said...

whole natural foods are best anyway, and many people are gluten sensitive these days because of GMO foods, what a shame! i've been GF over 2 years now, and last time i ate some white gravy with chicken, i got so bloated and gassy and uncomfortable, it felt like the flu. never again! i don't miss yeasty bread and it's just a habit to take toppings off pizza and stick it on top of a salad. i won't give up blue cheese dressing though. i read a lot about inflammation, due to knee problems, and fish oil is also a good way to help symptoms. reducing inflammation in your body is a big step towards good overall health. Well Being Journal is a great source of info, and Pamelas products are YUMMY GF, especially the pancake mix, i even used it to make cobbler for my Hubby!

CindyB said...

Oops I meant gluten not glutton!

Terje said...

Whole Foods offer some incredible free classes for gluten-free cooking. I learned tons. While I am not gluten-free, I had a girl in my Girl Scout troop who was and I wanted to know how to plan for her food needs, particularly since she was recently diagnosed with celiac disease and was still learning herself. Aside from that, the Celiac Society offers some fantastic references and handouts that are just the best in terms of brands to go to/avoid and recipes that work. Baking was the toughest for me but now that's easy too. Good luck! I bet you see some fantastic improvements if you do have a sensitivity to gluten.

MelissaSue said...

One step at a time. Try finding a replacement for one food that you love at a time. You can do it!!

Virginia Severson said...

I have found that it is good to eat a balance of raw and cooked vegetables. I, too, have given up wheat for the sake of inflammation in my lower back. It works. I started last Thanksgiving and have lost five pounds and I'm an average size person. If I can do it, so can you. Have faith.

Kathy Kuykendall said...

I have eliminated foods with MSG. It has made a major difference in me. I was surprised to see so many of the same foods with MSG on your list. Maybe we are on to something here.

f77efd44-8ab0-11e2-a16b-000bcdca4d7a said...

It's not as bad as it seems, Bonnie! The real challenge for you will be all the eating out/potlucks you have to deal with. I've been gluten free for about four years now. The way to go is SIMPLE - fresh, basic food. I've learned to carry some GF crackers/cereal/bread with me; I can usually deal with other foods as long as I have that.

There are a number of GF bloggers out there. Glutenfreegirl.com and glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com are two I've enjoyed.

If it helps, it is worth it!!! And, it does get easier!

Terri in BC said...

My daughter went gluten-free last year. I'll check with her and see if she has any tips. I know she makes a lot of her own stuff, and doesn't buy much that is advertised "gluten-free".

Tressa said...

You can eat the grain, Teff. It's gluten free and although it's really tiny it has so much nutrition in it. Good luck.

Chickadee Quiltworks said...

I do not test positive for celiac but I have had much improvement since going off most gluten. I was having horrible stomach and joint pain. Within 3 days of going on a Paleo Diet, I saw such a difference and began to feel GREAT! Google Paleo and maybe there will be some tips there for you. I do best when I fix fresh foods myself and not processed stuff (I too was surprised about pickles) I actually shared this link on Facebook this morning: http://www.ihealthtube.com/aspx/viewvideo.aspx?v=ee63d1454bf82686 My best to you, you can do it and you will be so happy you did!

La Tea Dah said...

Our family has been gluten free (and vegetarian) for more than 10 years. The results have been measurable and enough that we have stuck with it. I hope you feel better soon!

Kasey said...

I am not gluten free, but as one with unusual food allergies, it can be tough to try to avoid a single ingredient. There are many gluten alternatives, and the internet will be your best friend. If you have a natural food store near you, they should have quite the selection along with employee to help you decipher what you might like.

It's already been mentioned, but eliminating sugar is another method to try. Refined sugar, especially.

Good luck!!!!!!!

qltmom9 said...

Get it ALL out of the house. Write out some menu plans. There is SO much you CAN eat. Focus on that. Some people use rice chex ground up to cook with like flour, I've heard. I tried gluten free for a month and just missed my bread...no relief from my health issues.

qltmom9 said...

Bonnie,
If gluten-free doesn't work, try soda pop free. Coke makes my legs Huuuurt.

Lucy~

Cheryl Willis said...

I am not gluten free but I don't eat obvious items with wheat. Breads, pasta etc..
I had no problems giving them up, never even had a taste or urge to try them after I committed to no wheat. What I noticed is my allergies are not as severe. I don't get the migraines I use too. I still have some discomfort in my knees and back but it seems to only be after we have gone out for dinner.
I also cut out soda. I am surprised about several items on your list. Good luck. hope you get it all figured out!

Jeni said...

Bonnie,
I first read about going Wheat Free, which would be the same as Gluten free, (only better) in October last year. I started right after Quilt Market when I got home, and ever since, have had so much pain dissappear! It's amazing! I read the book, "Wheat Belly" and have never gone back! Now that I know Wheat is basically poison, even if you don't have pain or celiacs disease, I don't even want it, and am not even tempted by it! Stay away from anything processed, and that can mean even "gluten free" food. You have to watch that it isn't processed also! Some "gluten free food is processed, which means, it isn't good either! Crazy, I know! I have lost at least 15 pounds and the pain in my knees and ankles is gone, as well as my hips. My neck is getting better also! The Carpel tunnel is getting better too! Whoooo hoooo! Great recipes in the Wheat Belly cook book. I make a great flat bread veggie pizza! Good luck and if you need any help, just say the word!! (search online, Wheat Belly, great video!)
Jeni (primitive Quilts and Projects Magazine)

Dora, the Quilter said...

It looks like you've had comments from a lot of knowledgeable people. For me the issue was corn products; by eliminating those (many of the foods on your list contain corn products)made a vast improvement in my health. I've noticed some sensitivities lately that may have to do with gluten; not thrilled about having to eliminate something else!
The blog Mennonite Girls Can Cook [blogspot] has many gluten free recipes too.
Also CoQ-10, Vitamin D, and Omega-3's can help immensely.
Good luck.

Kathy said...

I really like the blog http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/ and Stephanie O'Dea's Make it Fast, Cook it Slow cookbooks -- all gluten-free, practical recipes for the slow cooker. Hope you're feeling better soon.

Lori Huffman said...

I love this idea. I've been gluten free for a year now. We all need to share our knowledge. For instance, Tamari is great instead of the soya sauce that has wheat in it. I hear La Choy is gluten free. I love the Nut Thins Crackers, especially pecan. Potato flakes can be used as a thickener. Corn meal is a great coating instead of breadcrumbs, in fact the GF breadcrumbs are mostly cornmeal.

Lori Huffman said...

Good info, I'd love the recipe for Mushroom soup substitute if you don't mind.

Peggy Klock said...

Bonnie, check out the site Skinny Slow Cooker on Facebook. They have a gluten free area of recipes and they are delicious!

Catholic Bibliophagist said...

kingarthurflour.com has gluten-free baking mixes. (Their baking catalog is gorgeous. Even though I'm now diabetic and don't order from it any more, I still love reading it.)

--C.B.

Peggy Klock said...

Missed part of the site name
Skinny Ms Slow cooker

Sue Radkiewicz said...

Look here for some good info. http://www.greattastenogluten.com/great.asp
We've followed her Great taste no pain program for years and it's been great!

Missy Shay said...

I am not gluten free, but I have several friends who are. The only source I have found that has consistent good recipes for gluten free baking, is Bob's Red Mill baking book. It is not exclusive to gluten free baking, but great. Night shades, like tomatoes, peppers and potatoes, also cause inflammation.

Churn Dash said...

I haven't read the other comments.... a friend eliminated nightshade plants from her diet and had marked improvement (tomatoes, peppers (not salt and pepper pepper, but red pepper, green pepper etc), tomatoes and aubergine (eggplant). If gluten isn't the answer you might want to try a nightshade free diet. (I would hate to do it since I love tomatoes and eat them at least once a day!)

nobody said...

I've been gluten free for over 5 years, and my aha moment came when I realized that malted milk balls had gluten!

Once I had been GF for several months my lactose intolerance cleared up and that opened up more breakfast options. There are many more gluten free options now.

Most major chain restaurants have gluten free menus. I know you prefer local restaurants, as do I, but when traveling I know I can get gluten free food at a chain.

In the beginning I passed on the communion wafer, but now my church has GF wafers! It's nice to feel I'm participating fully in the communion ritual.

You've mentioned you don't cook much, you'd rather sew than spend time in the kitchen. You may find meals a bit of an adjustment as I find it is easier to be a scratch cook than eat processed food. I don't spend hours in the kitchen, but everything, including pudding, is made from scratch.

I had an issue with grits. I used to eat Malt O Meal or oatmeal for breakfast, and oatmeal was too contaminated for me, and the Bob's Red Mill brand was too expensive, so this northern girl borrowed a southern breakfast food. The label on the grits said they were made in a facility that also produced wheat products, and for over a year I was fine with grits. Then I got a batch that must have been contaminated and I was miserable until I figured out it was the grits. About the same time I discovered Trader Joe's gluten free oats, the package is twice as large as Bob's Red Mill oats and half the price.

Starburst candies are gluten free and have a similar texture to Twizzlers. I really miss beer. Sigh. There are some decent GF beers made with sorghum, but local brews are in a renaissance and I miss trying them.

I can highly recommend Chebe mixes. There's only one grocery chain in my metropolitan area that carries the cheese bread mix. Easy to make, tastes wonderful, and it's a breeze to freeze the dough once it is in balls. I loved the Chebe mix so much I bought a case of the cinnamon bread mix from Amazon, and it's good, too.

Many local pizza places now use Udi's GF crusts, and I can no longer keep track of the number of places that now have GF pizza.

Some restaurants will bring you GF soy sauce.

Oh, and another hidden source of gluten is fake crab. Nearly all fake crab has gluten, and nearly all crab in restaurants, unless it is a seafood place, is fake crab. I know that there is fake crab that is made without gluten, I ordered some GF sushi at a supermarket and the chef ended going back to the freezer and handing me the package of fake crab so I could verify it really was GF!

This is long and rambling, but as others have written, many of us took the plunge and are not going back. It gets easier, your biggest challenge will be all the travel that you do. Cruise ships can make accommodations. I had issues when I was in Bali a few years ago, and I ended up eating just seafood, rice and fruit and I came home 5 lbs thinner!

Good luck! And I really need to figure out how to change my Google profile so that it doesn't say "nobody", clearly I am somebody!

Lynmar said...

Bonnie this is really going to be much easier than you think. I have been GF for 32 years, it is sooo much easier now. There is much more information, and food available. The truly best way to go is fresh and when possible self prepared. With your schedule, and especially when driving you can take your own things with you. Costco carries a brand of crackers, oops, box got destroyed, will send you the name tomorrow. Anyway they now have become my snack, they have taste and crunch, everything one craves. One other ingredient that has recently started causing me problems is soy products. Unfortunately soybean oil show up in many bottled salad dressing, and other prepared foods. By the way I have never had a problem with Heinz Baked Beans. Welcome to our world, it really isn't as bad as it seems to be. Keep us posted on your progress. Lynda from Chicago

Mavis said...

Two books I can recommend: Wheat Belly and Cooking for Isaiah. The Wheat Belly has a cookbook too. We tried a gluten free challenge to see if it helped with our son's pain which comes from a genetic condition that we share. My husband had a major reaction when we went back on wheat so we are staying gluten free in our household for the most part (I cheat at lunch while at work). He obviously has a gluten intolerance issue. The hardest meal is lunch because of our dependence on sandwiches and that whole mindset. I'm still working on retraining myself for lunch so I can stay away from carbs. Breakfast is ok and easy to work around and so is dinner. There are lots of great pasta wheat substitutes in rice pasta. For me, I gained weight on gluten free pasta and during our month-long challenge. Wheat Belly covers this and explains the reason. Both my son and my husband feel much better off gluten. There is a connection to inflammation and it's covered in Wheat Belly. I bought the paperback but I'm quite sure it's available for the Kindle.

It's certainly worth trying for a month. Our month passed very quickly and then I felt like I was cheating when I had wheat again. I sure hope there is an answer for you because it's an easy solution and it's SEW much better to live pain free. Praying it works! Mavis

rsb said...

Bonnie Check on elana's pantry. she has lots of gluten free recipes.

Michele McCullough said...

Bonnie!! Welcome to better health. On Dec 8 I went wheat free,but not gluten free. I read an article on Wheat Belly on a healthy eating web site and after reading part of the Wheat Belly book and later watching Dr. OZ do a segment on the wheat we eat vs the wheat we ate 50 yrs ago, I stopped eating wheat. It may very well be a big part of our American waistline problems. I have had an increase in energy. Much of my fibromyalgia is gone. A big sign is of improvement is that the vasculitis that I have had on my lower calves for over 20 yrs is gone. GONE! My doctor told me it never goes away. He was wrong, of course when I tell him he will be excited and amazed and spread the word.

Thanks for helping to spread this word to so many who suffer cronic pain and arthritis. It's such a little thing to do without for such a great benefit. I am working toward eating a Paleo diet but it will be small steps. My husband was so impressed that he has gone wheat free too. BTW Kinnikinnick bread is the BEST gluten free bread available.

45th Parallel Quilter said...

Wow ... I read that list and I eat EVERYTHING on it ... this is a very interesting topic that I'm going to have to research further. Good luck, Bonnie ... sounds like you might be on the right track! Linda

crazy quilter said...

Bonnie I have several friends that are gluten intolerant also and I know ther are lots of temptations but I do know many grocery stores have many gluten free items you can substitute for the things that are making you hurt. I think trying for a month would certainly help you decide if this is the way to go or not! I applaud you and know you will find the answer.

Janice Dinse said...

I have terrible arthritis pain, now have it in my hip joints and can't walk for long, like you. I have been looking into vegan. I have read a lot about it and it seems it is a cure all for what ails ya! I have diabetes too. It is a really tough "diet" to follow, but just like anything else, I guess once you get used to it. I have gone to many meetings in Shelby, they now have a store in Gastonia. I have gone to their seminars and bought a lot of their books. Just a thought....I hate all the pain pills and just pain in general. Never thought gluten would be a cause for arthritic pain though. Good luck and keep us posted, seems a lot of us want to know how it works.

stashoverflow said...

I concur. I've been gluten-free since July 2012. Apparently I'm not sensitive to gluten but after reading Wheat Belly, I understand that modern wheat is not a good food. I haven't lost any weight but I have noticed that I don't have heartburn any more.

I didn't expect to find wheat in tomato soup but it's there. There are a few without it. You have to read labels on everything. I have a friend with celiac disease and I've learned from her that you have to read the label each and every time because companies change their product contents all the time.

Spelt is another gluten containing grain.

The biggest thing you have to understand is to not replace gluten-containing foods with gluten-free processed foods. That's a huge industry now. The processed gluten-free foods are very high in carbs and calories.

Wanda said...

We are not totally gluten free, but we eat very low carb and low sodium which limits our gluten. I find it harder to avoid all the sodium in some cases. We have been milk free in the past due to my son's and my allergies, but now after going totally without I find we can both eat it in limited amounts without having issues. I have a friend who is allergic to yeast and she has a really hard time with that one. I wish you much luck and good health. My best advice is read labels with a fine tooth comb.

Teri said...

I am on a restricted diet with my diverticulitis, and I know I would be doomed if I had to be gluten free also. Giving up flour and pasta would kill me- nope, couldn't do it.

queenopearls said...

Before throwing the baby out with the bathwater... or maybe while doing so, I encourage anyone interested to learn the difference between modern, lab created "grains" and their predecessors. Very interesting perspective on blaming the bathwater for throwing out the baby. lol
http://www.lentzspelt.com/whats-farro.html
~Christina in Cleveland

thepiececorps said...

You can do it! Look at all of this support! Remember ...baby steps, start with raw foods as they are no brainers. I have not gone gluten free but am slowly converting to Eat For Your Blood Type. More fruit, nuts, berries, and fish for me. Working on FMS and arthritis and of course Old age in general. B-)

stashoverflow said...

Forgot one thing. French fries that a lot of restaurants use now have a coating that contains wheat. Arby's curly fries are one but it's not just chains. If it says the fries are "seasoned", they probably contain wheat.

Cindy said...

Bonnie, IDK if ur a caffeine drinker but I had to cut out caffeine for my chronic pain. It made a huge difference. I need to work on the gluten part next.

Joyful Quilter said...

Check your local health food store (is there a Whole Food where you live?), lots of grocery stores have health food sections that include gluten free foods. Also look for organic. It's hard to start with but gets easier and the best part - it does make a difference.

Miss Carol said...

I gave up WHEAT for lent and it was the best decision I ever made. I have found that I feel WONDERFUL!! My daughter has been GF for three years now and she is the picture of health. I find looking and choosing the right foods an adventure. I am shocked that broth has wheat gluten in it. You have to read, read, read those labels. I am very good at this now, having used a product I never thought would bother me. When I eat something I shouldn't, my tummy burns and I soothe it with fresh milk straight from the cow.
You will be able to do this, just stay true to the cause. I have found wonderful recipes at http://www.gingerlemongirl.blogspot.com
I love making my own "bisquick". She walks you through what flours you need. I like her sight. There is so much out there and a lot to sort through. GOOD LUCK BONNIE.....YOU CAN DO IT!!!

zenquilter said...

Bonnie
I have Celiac Disease and have been gluten free for 25 years. The diet is not easy but it is easier than feeling sick. About 5 years after going gluten free I got a severe inflammatory arthritis that my doctors could not explain. I suffered for 5 years. After doing a lot of research and reading I found a connection between gluten issues and arthritis and nightshade plants (tomatoes potatoes eggplant peppers). So I decided to test it and within a day of dropping nightshade plants from my diet the joint pain disappeared. It worked immediately. I am now 54 and have maintained this weird diet without no joint issues for the past 15 years. The way I eat now is known as the paleolithic diet which is inherently gluten free dairy free and nightshade free. I do cheat with dairy- love cheese and ice cream.

Cindy said...

Bonnie, IDK if ur a caffeine drinker but I had to cut out caffeine for my chronic pain. It made a huge difference. I need to work on the gluten part next.

pattiespea said...

Yes, I am eating pretty much gluten free, although, it is not by choice. I was told to forget my potatoes, rice, pasta, bread and all sugars. Anything white is a sugar. I was also told to forget any type of fried foods. I kept saying, "I can not live on cardboard and lettuce."I guess we will see.

6dcaa73c-8abb-11e2-85ff-000bcdcb2996 said...

I would suggest contacting a Registered Dietitian (RD) in your area for accurate information regarding GF diets. Information on the internet may or may not be accurate. A Registered Dietitian has training in food intolerances as well as nutrition, so would provide accurate, evidenced based information which would help you determine if GF diet would be benificial for you. A Registered Dietitian can be located on Eatright.org.

Mimi said...

I too am surprised by pickles and blue cheese. But looking at that list of food - most of it should not be eaten by anybody. If we went back to food as it was grown our bodies and health $$ dollars would be much happier. Good luck on the gluten.... I got some granola type stuff on the gluten free isle this week and it was disgusting.... could taste "chemicals" .... but I know folks do it and I know they feel better so you GO GIRL ... and be sure and tell us the hints, etc.!!

Nay's Needlebook said...

Bonnie,

Powdered spices like garlic powder, onion powder, and dried mustard use wheat as an emulsifier. Be careful with any added sauces, and if you eat any imitation crab, it contains flour.

I feel better when I cut out the gluten, but those garlic rolls, are addictive!

Nay Hearn

Debbie said...

I had to go gluten free about 9 months ago due to severe gastrointestinal issues. After much study and reading I feel this has been a long term problem which caused my osteopenia, hypothyroid, and anemia. I have mainly gone paleo. Lots of vegys, fruit, grass fed beef, free range chicken eggs. I have tried some gluten free cake mixes etc, but they aren't too good. And aren't made with the best ingredients either. Remember junk food is junk food whether it is gluten free or not. For a snack I make popcorn with non-GMO corn. I also cut out any artificial sweeteners (they are really bad for you) and no high fructose corn syrup. I have cut down a lot on sugar but once in a while I buy a really great triple chocolate gelato made with only real recognizable ingredients. Use only olive or coconut oil. You should give it at least 3 months as it takes time for the gluten effects to subside. I have read that you may even feel worse for awhile as gluten has addicting qualities. It really is a much healhier diet and you will really feel better. Eating out is the hard part. You can go to Jimmy Johns and get an unwich (meat and cheese wrapped in lettuce), also at In and Out Burger you can order your burger protein style (no bun just wrapped in lettuce) you can also have fries there because that is the only thing they fry in their oil so there is no cross contamination with breaded foods. If you have a positive attitue you will do great. I read "Mark's Daily Apple" blog, he has great info.

Mimi said...

vegetables are not cardboard... they are real food! and in time the other stuff will taste "fake" to you.

Cathy said...

Kathy Smart is a Healthy Living Consultant she has been on Dr. Oz. Her Gluten-Free & Wheat-Free Cookbook is wonderful. LiveTheSmartWay.com. Give her recipes a try. A friend of mine went gluten free and she has changed, inside and out. She just looks different and has more energy than last year. Her changes have been very slow but I now see her outer differences. And she is happy with her internal changes too! I'm really not sure what a month will bring for you but I do hope you see & feel some change, enough so that you will continue. In the US your gluten free products will be cheaper price wise than up here in Canada. I know they are worth in as I waited for 2 hours in a very slow moving line sampling products to finally enter a Gluten-Free Expo. The first year 5,000 people attended, this year 25,000! The vendors were overwhelmed. I don't needed to be gluten free and have no allergies, I chatted with people who struggled for years and now can go out and eat because there is so much more info out there. There is gluten-free pasta, Quinoa salad or cookies and more to eat! Once you start looking and experimenting, this may just change your life! Good luck and happy eating and stitching!

TreadleToes said...

Sorry to hear of your pain...didn't know. Mainly out of curiosity, have you tried cannabis??

Mimi said...

I hope your Doctor does not disappoint you by not being excited or amazed or a "believer".

You have me thinking on the "wheat" thing.

ChrisP said...

Do it one day at a time. One month may not be enough, but if you head in that direction, over time, you'll feel better. Also realize that other allergies or sensitives might be helping the inflamation. I don't know if you've heard of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but it might be a good way to kick start your treatment. After that diet, not eating wheat is easy.

Good luck.

Mimi said...

Why do we even want to eat fake crab? We have gotten our food values mixed up. Let's go back to real fresh food.

Sandra Henderson said...

Oh Bonnie. I was just saying how I am worried about your FULL schedule and your health. I call for more REST!!!~ Please, please, please try to rest while you are home. I have NO idea how you do all you do.
Everything in moderation.. Yeah. I know. But...

Sandra Henderson said...

P.S.
I don't think cannabis (see above) would help your tight schedule. We'd find you still at home while a class in Alaska was waiting for you. May help your pain, but not your tight schedule. lol
Lordy, lorday

craftymary's blog said...

1 in 3 have gluten intolerance. I would have not known about celiac disease had it not been for my iron deficient anemia Was admitted to hospital with pancreatitus My Doctor ran a blood test that was very positive .Did an ERCP which showed damaged villa in intestines Since GF have decreased my thyroid dose and improved my balance and energy .ask your doc to test you. http://www.celiac.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4&Itemid=23

Char Scott said...

We have gone wheat free too. We use Romaine or iceburg lettuce leaves in place of bread for our sandwiches we prefer the lettuce now. We have also used rice in place of pasta when we could not get gluten free pasta for our spaghetti sauce- was actually pretty good.

If we cheat the pain comes back - an incentive to not cheat! Good luck on your journey and don't be hard on yourself!

Char Scott said...

We have gone wheat free too. We use Romaine or iceburg lettuce leaves in place of bread for our sandwiches we prefer the lettuce now. We have also used rice in place of pasta when we could not get gluten free pasta for our spaghetti sauce- was actually pretty good.

If we cheat the pain comes back - an incentive to not cheat! Good luck on your journey and don't be hard on yourself!

Sharon Hopkins said...

I got the 'Gluten for Dummies' and it is real informative...learner a lot for good price..

Kristin said...

My 7 year old can't process fructose, and there is fructose in gluten. So, for the past year I've been working on gluten-free recipes that a 7 year old approves of. There is very little prepared food in our pantry now. I've pretty much figured out baking without gluten, and have come up with some easy recipes - muffin mix, corn bread...I did a GF Thanksgiving, with rolls, gravy, EVERYTHING - and no one believed that it was GF. It is doable, but like any other lifestyle change - you have to WANT to make it work. It can be done!

sophie said...

After reading about the connection between gluten and arthritis pain, I decided to go gluten free in January. Soy sauce was the thing that I was surprised to learn had wheat as a major ingredient. In a couple months, I am experiencing less pain in my arthritic knees and a higher level of energy. The better I feel, the more motivated I am to avoid gluten.

Kathi Kraftyzales said...

"One Good Thing By Jillee" blog is awesome. Her son has celiac and she made some awesome GF bread. Check her site out. I make most of her diy products. Made 4 gallons of liquid laundry soap today!!

debgiggles said...

My eldest daughter, 31, was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance last year. It has been life changing but she has found she can eat just as normally as before. Gluten free products are all over, even bakery's have gluten free items now. I learned to make a great cheese cake that gluten free that's better then any restaurant one out there. Our last Thanksgiving dinner was completely gluten free and we gave up nothing.

nobody said...

I try to avoid it, but it shows up at potlucks and in shared appetizers at restaurants. It's good to be aware of all the gluten hiding places.

I had some wonderful crab nachos last week, made with real crab, yum! The texture is so much better than imitation crab.

Eileen said...

Wow what a list of answers. I wanted to suggest my friend Roben Ryberg's last book for Gluten Free. She has just finished her last one which I helped encourage and test for her. Delicous. It is called "You won't Believe It's Gluten Free". Can be found at Amazon as are a cookie book and her first one. It would probably be hard for you while you travel. Just have to learn and let the hosts know about it and they might provide the right food. I can tell you from the way you talk about the food you get it is probably most all wrong. Like others have said you need to make your own. She uses a lot of White and brown Rice, potato, and several other flours and many stores are stocking them now. Enjoy the process.

Bunnie said...

Once you commit your home to gluten-free you can be vigilant in the store and relaxed at home. Once you get past what you can't have, you can concentrate on all the things you CAN eat. My husband was very supportive of going gluten-free, then he found out he was sensitive to even more stuff. We had a period of mourning for the food we couldn't have again. It was like a death in the family. We cleared out the pantry and started fresh and wheat (and dairy and egg) free. We found a series of allergen-free recipes. We concentrated on what we could eat, not trying to adapt our favorites, but find new ones. The substitute stuff never tastes the same, because it's different. There's a reason they make bread with wheat. It works best.
Write down the reasons you are changing your diet. Review them when you want to "cheat." If you do have to have one bite, make sure it's the homemade warm chocolate cookie, not the stale store cheap cookie. Make a change for your LIFE! Good luck. Bunnie

deb g said...

many things on your list can be found without gluten. we have been gluten free for over 2 years, my husband also did it to do pain control to avoid back surgery. it is much easier to find gluten free now then 2 years ago. Many make ups and medicines have gluten, so watch for that also. You might also want to consider giving up perservatives, as this will help with swollen joints. It often takes 6 months of giving up gluten to really see full results.

Andra Gayle said...

My brother does Gluten free and he eats a lot of hummus...

Misha said...

I've been gluten free for 11 years now, and while there's a learning curve to it, I'm so glad I did! It's been a lifesaver for me. I was in so much pain all the time before I went GF. I sort of skimmed the comments (so sleepy today) and I agree that sugar *for some people* can also be a source of inflammation. Both gluten and sugar cause joint main for me, personally.

I agree with the person who suggested the book Gluten Free for Dummies. Danna Korn is the author and she ROCKS! Also, I think I remember you like to use your crock pot (forgive me if I'm wrong) and there's a great blog that has a ton of GF crockpot recipes http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/

MJ said...

Bonnie, there's a documentary.. "Forks over Knives" and a cookbook by the same name. You should watch it. The friends I have told about it, tried it and have had amazing health changes. I am seeing them myself. Best of luck

Mary said...

Hey there is NO Gluten in Chocolate, right? I'll bring you some when I see you next week. Quilters and Chocolate go together!

Beth Strand said...

Bonnie, the National Celiac Foundation has a great start-up page and you might like this link http://www.celiac.ca/index.php/about-celiac-disease/celiac-news-articles/blue-cheese/ about testing to see if blue cheese actually has gluten or not. I have a great scone recipe I can send you and there is a nice substitute flour that I mix up to keep on hand for banana bread, scones and cookies. Also, Glutino has some great packaged stuff. I've been gluten free for about five years and I do feel much, much better! Hang in there, it gets easier. pbstrand@msn.com

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JaneB said...

I can't believe how many comments are in this thread! Mt DH is gluten and sugar free because of an autoimmune disease and related fatigue syndrome. We order gluten free noodles from Amazon Prime (Hodgsen Mills). He can tolerate a little spaghetti sauce, but we have to watch his sugar intake, especially before bed. Potatoes are out for him because they are high glycemic index food ( they quickly turn into sugar). Good luck on changing your diet. You will feel much better because of the change.

pcflamingo said...

My dad's sister had celiac disease 50+ years ago and at family gatherings we always had things made with rice flour for her. There was NOWHERE near the gluten alternatives then that there are now. There is a book called The Abascal Way by Kathy Abascal on Vashon Island, WA promoting her version of the anti inflammatory diet. It's not just wheat, but all sugars that cause inflammation in the body.

norma v said...

when you start to feel good and then fall off the wagon, it's easier to get back on...then you eventually lose the temptation to fall off because you know what the next day will bring and it will be a decision between feeling good or hurting...i am not on the wagon 100 percent of the time...i cheat...until my body tells me to stop and sometimes it lets me get away with it for a little bit...

GranChris said...

Beware of things that say GFree and aren't really. Use only the trusted sources. King Arthur has a great flour as does Jule. UDI makes a wonderful bread. Even your Vitamins can have Gluten, bouillon, broths etc all can have Gluten. It is not easy, you have to read labels, avoid MSG and sulfites while you're at it. Basically eat like your Grandparents without the Gluten and in 30 days you'll feel better and in 60 a lot better. If you remove sugar then you will really feel better. It is often said eat a rainbow and white is dead. Not a bad one to remember.

RICHARD david said...

Gluten free foods are good for health, because Gluten is often a proteins intricate within rice, barley, rye as well as triticale. Corn as well as almond in addition contain gluten, nevertheless are viewed as gluten-free, since the gluten inside these types of types tend not to lead to celiac disease.

Aliceart said...

Wowee. Blue cheese and mustard!?! Sounds tough; I'll be sending good thoughts your way for willpower and health. Hang in there!

Alcea Rosea 31 said...

Going gluten free has improved both mine and my husbands lives. A lot of other health problems, I didn't know were related to eating gluten, cleared up. Skin problems, joint ache etc. Gluten is hidden where you wouldn't expect it. I would much rather live gluten free, than have all the health issues.

Janet said...

I am not gluten free but I became wheat free last November and it immensely helps my reflux problem and my arthritis. Wheat free means I don't eat wheat, but I eat rice and many other grains. There are some great gluten/wheat free mixes out there which I use for the occasional pizza or cake. Mostly I just don't eat those kinds of things though. I use oat flour for gravies and sauces. Check out http://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-free/
You can buy gluten free soy sauce. Check out http://www.san-j.com/product_categories.asp.
There are many gluten free coldcut meats available these days - they are labelled gluten free. And there are gluten free beers. The ones I have tried haven't been that great, but since I am only Wheat free I get to drink some beers that have no wheat but still have some gluten. :)
We eat loads of veggies and lots of meat, potatoes, quinoa, rice. We cook enough for supper that there are usually leftovers for lunch. Bread is pretty well gone from our diets although I do have a loaf of gluten free bread (made from almond flour) in the freezer for when I just want a piece of toast. Coldcuts are great on rice crackers and there is a huge variety of gluten free crackers out there. Once you start looking around you'll find that gluten free is readily available these days. Good luck with it - I'm sure you'll feel better.

Pinkadot Quilts said...

I eat Paleo and will never go back to a regular American diet of crud. Right away you will feel better and have tons of energy. It is simple but the key is to eat REAL food. I too had aches hips that pain is gone. It is not a diet but a lifestyle that also includes exercise.
Good luck

Sue SA said...

I have a best friend who is gluten intolerant and I am lactose intolerant...it makes dining out interesting! The biggest thing I found is that lactose is used as a filler in drugs...eg I gave up dairy and was still unwell....because the contraceptive pill has lactose in it....and now when I buy medications I always ask them to check if it has lactose in the ingrediants. And an intolerance is just that...you can cope with a small amount, but little bits here and there build up in your body and then you get a reaction (eg pain/discomfort) and you think you cannot pinpoint it to one particulary food cos you havent consumed it in the last 24 hours....but it might be a few weeks of a bit here and there. Hence it took me a long time to work out the dairy, and from there I was able to work out that for me it is only the lactose (natural milk sugar)...so I cannot have straight cream, ice cream or milk but a small amount of hard cheese is fine. I think you need to accept that working out what your problem is will take some time and that might be more difficult while you are on the road/eating at catered for workshops. But on the whole people are happy to help if you give them advance notice and sometimes you need to be quite specific..eg I need a green salad without dressing...to be really sure. It is a pain in the neck at first to modify your diet, but you will quickly learn the pay off is worth it...the first time you "poison" yourself cos you think that treat is worth it and are sick as anything!Good luck, hope it makes a positive difference. If it is not gluten then be prepared to give up something else, persist until you are pain free..it will be worth it.

Cheryl said...

Read the book Wheat Belly, I have been doing it for 18 months and not only feel wonderful but have lost over 50 lbs. It isn't as hard as you think and you will feel wonderful.

Beth in TN said...

I've been gluten free (of wheat--I still eat rice and potatoes) for over a year. It has cured my migraines. The thing that is most difficult about it is that you are eating more fresh food rather than processed, so you do make more trips to the grocery store. On the road, many restaurants will prepare gluten-free entrees, but if you're not sure, stick to salads but always be wary of the salad dressings (esp. creamy ones). The best way to approach it is to focus on what you CAN eat, not what you CAN'T eat! I recommend Wheat Belly book too!

JaNae said...

Watch out for modified food starc and you can add Barbecue sauce to your list of foods to watch out for. Read the labels. You will be surprised.

Sharon said...

Bonnie, Elizabeth Hassleback of The View fame found she was gluten intolerant when she was on The Survivor. She has several cookbooks out there and she recommends the health food store. She even bakes things. Fresh food is key too. Good Luck. I've been toying with the idea but DH is the cook and he won't accommodate me in this (or much else truth be told). I'll be interested to see how you do.

Michelle Brewster said...

Bonnie, Not only is GF an option, but while you are at it, make sure you cut out ALL artificial sweeteners. The worst on, Aspertame, was originally marketed for ant poison!?! It has been linked to many health ailments including most of the same issues Gluten is blamed for.

deelish10 said...

I am diabetic and more or less got gluten free due to lowering my blood sugar. I don't eat the list you provided and switched to whole foods and meat. I am now off the pills and have low numbers but more trip to the fresh market and I cook everything not boxed packages. on top of all of this I am allergic to pepper, any pepper, chili, and so it is a challenge to buy anything but fresh. I feel better but it took longer than a month! give it a try but allow your body to tell you if it doesn't work, and read everything!

Chris@Cats On My Quilts said...

I am gluten free and I love it. I had my left knee replaced 7 years ago and had an appointment to have surgery on my right knee this fall because of debilitating pain. My right hip was also hurting. I have been reading quite a bit about Gluten Intolerance and the symptoms and I decided to try it and within 10 days the pain in my hip and knee were gone! Completely gone. It is miraculous in my mind. Do it! There are so many gluten free substitutes for just about everything that it's not as hard as you think. I feel fabulous now and I felt so old before.

Karen's Quilts from Cape Town said...

I've been trying to avoid wheat and gluten (and any sugars other than glucose). Last night for the first time we made galettes (pancakes) using ground buckwheat, eggs, milk and butter, served with savoury fillings, they tasted great. Buckwheat does not have gluten. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckwheat.

Sally said...

I try to be gluten free and feel better when I am, it improves my wellbeing, no stomach pain and my mood lifts as a consequnece. I'm in the UK and have made cornbread for years (and get mercilessly ribbed for it!) I love cornmeal pancakes with anything from curry to fruit. Avoiding the major things like gluten grains is enough for me, I dont obsess about ingredients and DO eat the odd cake!

deelish10 said...

it doesn't take long in the kitchen, but maybe making your own mustard would be a good thing. it is very easy and doesn't take time. you can carry bit of homemade condiments with your so you know you are safe. Since I have a severe capsaicin allergy I will do anything it takes not to end up in ER at any cost as my asthma kicks in. Just do it and keep doing it.

kt said...

Sure. I make this like a white sauce--Heat a 4 oz can of sliced mushrooms with their liquid, plus enough liquid to make 1/2 cup in a sauce pan. Dissolve 2 T cornstarch in 1 c. cold chicken broth and add, along with 1/4 t. onion powder and 1/4 t garlic powder. Heat, stirring often, until thickened.

Sarah said...

My husband is also gluten-free. Initially he was freaked out that there wouldn't be anything that he could eat. However, MANY grocery stores have lots of gluten-free products now. There are an amazing number of people who are on gluten-free diets now. We've also found that individuals who have various forms of autism are also better when they are on a gluten-free diet.

The biggest thing is to just get used to reading labels and ingredients. Many regular foods are in fact gluten free. They do make gluten-free soy sauce and beer (beer was the worst reaction my husband has had to anything with gluten in it).

A key item that wasn't on your list of foods to watch out for is flavored potato chips. They use wheat as a binder for the flavorings. Plain potato chips are fine though....so you can still have your indulgences. :-)

suzanne, dutchess county NY said...

I have arthritis in my back, hands, knees and feet. The hands are the worst as sometimes it hurts to stitch. I was told to not use too much salt and to avoid any of those convenience foods like box mixes, sauce and flavoring packets, canned goods. All way to much salt. I don't really use much if nay of those things. Salt aggregates inflammation and also is an autoimmunity problem. I guess I'll try to cut out gluten too.

Mimi said...

Oh Bonnie, since you don't have 50 pounds to loose, I have them - message me and I will send them over.

Pamelyn said...

This may be the best, most surprisingly beneficial thing you can do for your health. The food industry is not looking to keep food healthy, they are looking out for the interests of their shareholders. And GMO food and continuing research is frightening.It's no wonder people are sick. So glad to hear you're going to "try it"; you'll see positive results in less than a week. Good for you!

Pamelyn said...

I almost forgot to give you my little gluten free blog link! http://easygf.blogspot.com

Hope it gives you some ideas!

Claudette Adams said...

I am gluten free (most of the time). Don't think about what you can't eat, think about what you can. Pasta was hardest for me because I ate it almost every day. I still make my spaghetti sauce but put it over rice instead. There are even some good gluten free pastas but you have to try them to find which you like. Even Wal-mart now carries gluten free pastas. There are some really good nut crackers and of course corn chips and tortillas. If you are having Mexican just ask them to substitute corn tortillas for flour. I usually go for weeks gluten free then slip up. I don't have celiac so it's more just I feel better when I don't eat it.

Nancy said...

Started GF a couple of months ago, already less pain in joints. Best help books "Wheat Belly" Practical Paleo by Diane San.filippo great recipes. And info, JJ Virgin Diet for more diet sensitive issues, gluten my not be the only culprit. GMO corn, soy and eggs from chickens fed tbese grains. Not the same foods our moms ate.
Nancy

Material Girl said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Material Girl said...

Wow, I had no idea that so many of the products you mentioned contain Gluten, I have been having digestive problems for about a year now. I've lost a lot of weight which I didn't need to loose because I wasn't over weight to begin with, so now I am terribly underweight, but haven't been tested and didn't even think that it could be Gluten related until now. My Dr thinks that I have IBS and I think that is probably some of my problem too, I started out with acid reflux problems and now I've been having bowel problems. Dr. has me booked in for a colonoscopy next week and hopefully the GI Endoscope too, but I seriously think I'm going to try going Gluten Free and see if that helps with my digestion issues.
A good friend of mine has celiac disease but we haven't really talked about the condition, but now I think I'm going to ask her more about it.

Thanks so much for telling us about your health issues Bonnie, I had no idea you were having these problems, and I truly hope that going GF helps you to get feeling better.
And thanks to everyone who posted websites for more information, I went to each of them and read everything I thought might be helpful.

kelli said...

Practical Paleo by Diane Saniflippo has saved our lives. Once you figure out the meal planning and that's the beauty to her book, you will feel so much better. I promise! http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Paleo-Customized-Whole-Foods-Lifestyle/dp/1936608758/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1363100421&sr=8-1&keywords=practical+paleo

Nancy said...

Not sure if first post went thru. I have bbeen GF for a couple of months and joint pain is already much better. Great books are "Wheat Belly, Practical Paleo by Diane Sanflippo great recipes, and The Virgin Diet by JJ Virgin" last one helps you find other food sensitivities like GMO corn, soy and eggs from chickens fed these foods. Great reads and very helpfull.
You can do this, it's great not hurting so much.
Nancy

Wyse Acres said...

I have been gluten free for going on 2 years now. Doing so has helped in a number of ways. The other day when you mentioned in your blog that you had travelled somewhere and were fed a wonderful lasagna dinner,at that time I wondered how I would do your job and still eat GF. I suspect that one of the challenges you will encounter is in how to communicate with people about dietary restrictions. Some people get it and others just do not. In the beginning it is very overwhelming, so just start by going basic and simple with you diet. Then work at adding in the GF foods. Chili's, Red Robin, P.F. Changs, are a few that have GF menus. A smart phone is a big help in order to look up foods and restaurants. Do a search on Pinterest as there are many recipes to be found there. Not all blue cheeses have gluten! Ask questions when you go to your deli for meats also. Not all are GF. A lot of people have offered great information and I thought I would share a couple of things, I had not seen. Also... Heartland Gourmet has a mix for GF Red Velvet Cupcakes that is to die for!!

Michelle's Longarm said...

Great analogy!! I said I could never be "a scrappy quilter". But now its my favorite quilting style. Back to basics...like scrap quilting. My son has Celiac Disease and we have be gluten-free for 8 months. Give it a try. Michelle in VA

Quiltluver said...

I went Gluten Free.. It is in EVERYTHING! Crazy even soy sauce.

Mimi said...

food industry is looking out for the the directors, CEO and CFO's interests.... shareholders do not share much if at all in businesses profits....

Diana said...

I would suggest reading The Paleo Solution Diet by Robb Wolf. The book explains your body processing food and why you need to avoid some things for a healthier life. My husband and I started eating the Paleo Solution a year ago February and the results are amazing. It is gluten free, no dairy, no beans. Good healthy eating and great recipes. Even though you might not choose this diet it will explain what happens in your body and the benefits that can result including RA, Diabetis, Fibermyalgia and many other ailments. Just a suggestion to explore.

Lisa said...

My SIL is gluten free and feels much better. She said restaurant hash browns have a wheat coating and eating out is not fun anymore but we live on a small island with limited choices.

kt said...

fyi--If you want a clear diagnosis of Celiac, don't change your diet until after your endo, if you can wait--you need to be eating gluten to be diagnosed, since the gluten damages your villi, and once you stop eating it they start to heal. Good luck with it!

Jaye said...

I have eaten a gluten free diet for the pas 12 years or so. I get extreme inflammation of the joints if I eat gluten. My life is so much better without it. It isn't that hard and there are a lot of options. Here are some tips:
1. Buy Tom Sawyer flour online. It can be substituted 1-1 for wheat flour.
2. amazon has a lot of GF food.
3. You will probably need to eat more protein.
4. Get rid of all the gluten food in your house and make everyone eat gluten free. It will make your life easier. The only gluten food I keep in the house is bread for my boys. Sometimes they buy licorice or other candy and I just don't eat it.
5. I don't follow any of the published diets. I do what works for me.
6. Eat food. If I can identify what it is, I will eat it. That means not a lot of processed foods.
7. Plan ahead. If we are doing somewhere that may be a food problem for me, I eat first.
8. Bring snacks when you travel.
9. Udi's sandwich bread is the best.
10. I lost 40 lbs in 3 months eating a GF diet and doing nothing else. I have gained some of it back, but that was a real morale booster.
11. The first 3-4 months are the hardest, because you don't what to eat.
12. Trader Joe's has a brochure that lists most of their GF foods.
13. There were a couple of good articles recently in the NYT.

Please contact me for more info. I am happy to answer any questions or steer you towards foods that I like.

Amanda said...

I am deathly allergic to gluten, but found out about it 3 yrs ago (I'm 45 now). Watch your spices, cooking spray (I use Pam),mayo (I use Helman's as it is gluten free, medications even make-up has gluten in it. Gluten is so widespread that it is not funny.

I use Jule's Gluten Free Flour that I order online and it has the xanthan gum already in it and you use it 1-1 for regular AP Flour. She also has cornbread mix, cake mix, cookie mix and bread mix for sale all her products are awesome. At least, I love them!

Bob Mills has a variety of Gluten Free products. You can also check you health food stores.

Schar has a variety of breads & pasta. I love their products.

I know this is just a little, but if you want more information I would be happy to share with you and answer questions for you if you want.

Will be praying all goes well with the lifestyle change.

Michelle G said...

I've have tried to be gluten free but wasn't able to sustain it. I found it really hard. I too have arthritis and it was suggested to cut out gluten. When I was trying to be gluten free I took a gluten free baking course from my local polytechnical school. The course really helped because it taught me to make decent bread at home that was gluten free. Part of not sticking to the gluten free diet was that the food tasted awful and was expensive.

Cheryl's Teapots2Quilting said...

Try the blog Mennonite Girls can cook. http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2013/03/the-final-oatmeal-cookie.html This is just one of many gluten free recipes on their blog. Good luck.

Material Girl said...

Thanks so much for the info kt, will see what happens, but I will be glad when these tests are done with. I'm not looking forward to them at all.

Emma said...

I've recently come into the knowledge that I'm gluten intolerant and, while I'm gluten free, my husband isn't. I did a month long elimination diet and, during the reintroduction period, I got a stomach ache every time I tried it (but not dairy, non gluten grains, or legumes). My husband's aunt has celiac's so I will be able to eat at family gatherings.

My overall grain (non gluten ones) is no more than one serving per day. I eat tons of veggies, some fruit and nuts, meat, and non industrial fats whenever I can. There is nothing in grains that you can't get in other foods, not even fiber! 1 cup of cooked broccol has more fiber than 1 cup of instant oatmeal, 1 cup of raspberries has more than 1 cup of whole wheat spaghetti, and 1 oz of almonds has more than 1 slice of whole wheat or multi grain bread!

If you need recipes, please shoot me an email. I'm pretty new to this, but I figure that if it's delicious, I should pass it on and pay it forward!

Unknown said...

A possibility - if you are on medications they could be the root cause of your pain. Cholesterol meds cause me all kinds of aches, pains and muscle problems.

Katie said...

We have a gluten-free household. DH has celiac and dermatitis herpetiformus. It's not hard once you figure out your sources for g-f products, I just have to be more organized and willing to spend more time in the kitchen. And it's not a loose weight" diet either because there is so much you can eat! It is a bit harder if you are a traveler, but some research will find you all sorts of sources and advice. At first DH hated to always be the odd person at business lunches and seminars. It's been heart-warmng to discover how willing co-workers, vendors and friends are to make sure he has something nice to eat too. It also helps when you can find restaurants that truly understand what gluten-free means. Best of luck!

Katie said...

PS McCormick mustard powder should be gluten-free. I think just about all their products are.

gwensans said...

Thank you for sharing. I am equally shocked and disappointed. I am newly GF and just discovered Bavarian wheat free bread and it is scrumptious. Would you care to share any GF or WF premade breads you enjoyed? Sadly, I am no baker.

Diane Wilcox said...

I have had intestinal problems for years, pain in my joints, lower back and neck. Now I have Rheumatoid arthritis and the stiffness that comes with it. My husband said maybe we could find a diet that would help me and help him loose weight. I read every word that has been writen on this page and realized I'm eating all the wrong foods. I am going today and buy one of the books that has been suggested and cut out all gluten and sugar. The sugar is going to be the hardest. Sugar in my coffee, tea and regular cokes. Reading your comments has opened my eyes to a lot of my problems. Thanks for sharing your experiences and advice. This old lady is going Gluten free. Wish me luck!!!

Diane Wilcox said...

I have had intestinal issues for years along with joint pain, neck and lower back pain. Now I have Rheumatoid arthritis and the stiffness that goes along with that. My husband suggested we find a diet to try that would help me with the pain and help him lose weight. I normally read a little on someones page but not all. I have read every word written on this page and OMG!!! I am buying one of the books suggested and going GF. I will say I believe the hardest thing for me is the sugar. Sugar in my coffee, tea and drink regular cokes. I can feel the panic setting in just thinking about my sugar. But hey if that is part of my problem I need to correct it. I love to quilt and putting the binding on or any hand stitching is hard to do. Thank you ladies for all the wonderful advise and this old lady is going GF. Wish me luck!!!

Anonymous said...

Due to some digestive issues in June 2015, I eliminated a whole host of foods right up front for 6 weeks. Then over a four month period, I added various groups back into my diet. When it came to wheat/gluten foods, I made the decision that I didn't even miss it -at least not enough to matter. THE REASON- a 3-time surgery knee no longer ached and all my other joints that would also get stiff when I overdid an activity required over the counter pain meds. I still get Krispy Kreme doughnut thoughts as well as Costco pizza pangs. But now almost a year later, I remain gluten/wheat free (dairy free, too) with no pain meds and a 20+ lb. weight loss over this time. And no sinus infections over the past two allergy seasons!