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Friday, September 11, 2020

Quilter’s Project Planner Social Media Tour (And Gift-Away!)


Something fun is going on!

I always tend to think of Labor Day as the kick off of Official Quilting Season. (Not that every season isn’t quilty – but holiday projects are now entering the forefront of our quilty lives!)

How do we keep it all organized?

So many projects i progress, so much in formation on yardage needed, How can we keep track of it all and make better use of our time?

The Quilter’s Project Planner is a must have!


And this is the perfect time to really see just what the Quilter’s Project Planner is!

And what it can do for you.

I am stop 3 on the Quilter’s Project Planner Social Media Tour!


Newly released by C&T Publishing, The Quilter’s Project Planner has everything you need to start planning your next great project! Set your project goals, track your progress, and manage your time and works-in-progress (WIPs).


And it’s more than just the “write your project here” kind of Planner – there are 5 different tabs to help you see your year in advance, and plan just what it is going to take for you to reach that goal.

tracking your project is easy with this fabulous format!


I am excited!  Even the contents page lit my fire!

I really need this in my life.


Seeing the 12 months of the year laid out like this -

It’s going to help me stay better organized.

And maybe also realize that I have crammed too much stuff into one month of the year, and maybe I better reevaluate my timeline.


Having a quilt dream is great -

But how are you going to put some action behind it?

That’s what these pages are for!


The project pages are large and roomy!

Each project has two full pages for everything from project details to construction/cutting notes (like which way to press those triangles so they nest!) There is a task check list, and a place for fabric & supplies required – notions, templates & tools needed.

And perhaps a place to write a note as to just where you stored that project so you can find it when it is time to work on it again!


Plenty of graph paper!

Draw out that design – or figure out to turn the corner on that border just right.

And don’t you love the spiral binding??


I find this so valuable!

How often do we forget who we’ve given a quilt to? Or just which quilt it was?  Keep track of them here!

There is also a page for a Charity Quilt Tracker, and another for Quilt Alongs, Bees, & Mystery quilts.  Guess what is coming up SOON!?

It doesn’t stop there.  There is also a Workshop Tracker, and a Retreat Tracker. including a Retreat Packing List!  You’ll have everything you need to work on those projects away from home.

There is a page for Quilt Shows Attended, and also for Quilts that you have loaned out for display. 

This planner is your brain on quilts!

Always looking for info on your Favorite Quilt Shops?  There is a page to add that info here.

And don’t forget your Sewing Machine Sales & Service shops – keep them listed so you will always have that info at your fingertips.

The contacts tab also has entries for My Quilt Guilds, My Longarm Quilters and pages for your best Quilty Friends and Online Favorites.

And don’t forget the reference pages that list things from inches to decimals, backing yardage calculator, binding hints and more.


You need this.  You want this!

You could win this!

I will be drawing for a winner to receive their OWN Quilter’s Project Planner, and it could be you!



We will draw for our winner on Friday, September 18th when the tour ends!


Please note that all prizes MUST be shipped to a USA Address.  If you win from outside of the USA, you can have the prize shipped to a friend with a USA Address who can forward it on to you.

And don't forget to visit these other stops on the Social Media Tour, entering to win on each site!


Quilter's Project Planner Social Media Tour

9/10     Terificreations- Teri Lucas     terificreations.com
9/11     Quiltville- Bonnie Hunter     quiltville.blogspot.com
9/12     Quilt Fabrication- Susan Arnold    quiltfabrication.com
9/13     Zippy Quilts- Mary Puckett     zippyquilts.blog/
9/14     Lilo Bowman     lilobowman.com/
9/15     SewVeryEasy - Laura Coia     youtube.com/sewveryeasy
9/16     Slice of Pi- Laura Piland     sliceofpiquilts.com/
9/17     C&T Publishing     ctpub.com/blog/

For you that can’t wait – I have 2 cases of The Quilter’s Project Planner on their way to me, and they are available for pre-order – meaning your order will ship as soon as books arrive. I am expecting them in the next week to 10 days.  You’ll find them in both the New and Books category of the Quiltville Store!



Also in the New Category!

Check out Love Your Creative Space by Lilo Bowman!

These two books go so well together – hand in hand as they say!  Both are on sale for $19.99 each. Read more about Love Your Creative Space in my original post.

And there is also something we should not forget today:


Where were you, September 11, 2001?

I will always remember where I was as this day unfolded. Getting my kids off to school while living in Waxahachie Texas.

It couldn't be real, it didn't seem possible - I was in a stupor for weeks. It still hurts my heart deeply.

I think I will be pausing many times to remember, to think, to consider.

What were you doing on this day?  Let me know in the comments below.



Quiltville Quote of the Day -

May we always remember, and let it make us continue to love each other harder, no matter our differences.

Have a wonderful Friday, everyone.


78 comments:

  1. Teaching in Washington DC, within sight of the Pentagon

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  2. I was teaching in a preschool that morning. The Director tapped on the door and asked me to step out in the hallway and listen to the overhead speakers for a minute. I heard that the Pentagon had been hit by a plane and I knew that my husband was to be in a meeting there that morning. But I felt calm inside at the thought, so I knew he was safe.
    When I got home at 12 noon, my daughter had the tv on watching it, and she said Dad called and was on his way home. The meeting had been moved to 2pm just that morning, so none of them were in that section of the Pentagon that had been hit in the am. It was such a frightful day, watching all the destruction and the people trying to get home. HOME! Such an important word in times of worry and catastrophe.
    Thank you for your blog, Bonnie.

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  3. Great poster for the day. Love the new planner, would enjoy winning that. The resident TV watchers are a hoot. Have a great weekend with all your new arrangements & toys.

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  4. i remeber watching all day on TV!! My kids were in School a few blocks away. The teachers tuned in from there. Unbelievable horror! #neverforget

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  5. The company I was working for had just been sold and the transition team from Arkansas was in the Shenandoah Valley working with us. They flew in to D.C. and were scared spitless. They so wanted to go home but couldn't, we did everything we could to make them feel safe and welcome. Fast friendships were made that day and I will never forget. Also visited the Flight 93 Memorial July, 2019 and am still feeling the emotions of that visit. Always in my heart.....

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  6. I was at work as a legal secretary. We had the tv on all day in every room that had one. My husband had worked graveyard shift and I kept calling him trying to wake him up so he could turn on the tv. One of our clients called from New York and I asked if he was okay. He hadn't heard. Marilyn Marks

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  7. I had just got to work and someone was watching the breaking news, then I was trying to get in touch with my kids to make sure everyone was ok. My oldest daughter and son in law were first responders, this day is always hard on them. Never forget!

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  8. I was at an employment agency, testing for a job after moving from Nevada to Oregon. Didn't know it was happening until the owner stopped the testing and sent me home.

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  9. My day in Washington DC, Capitol Hill began with watching the second airplane crash into the other World Trade Tower live while the commentator was talking about how the (first) crash might have been a pilot with medical issue etc. It was followed by a reporter in front of White House talking while there were billows of smoke behind him that he was not aware of. I was trying to figure out the direction of what was burning--thought it might be Pentagon, but no one was reporting on it. A while later as they were reporting on the Pentagon and talking about a 4th plane in the air, people came running down the street by my house away from the Capitol. They had been told to run for their lives. Then came the enormous boom that shook everything in the house. I ran out to look in the direction of the Capitol, but saw no smoke. Eventually I learned it was a sonic boom from a low flying jet. Later in the Post the pilot, a woman, wrote about that experience and how she fully expected to fly her jet into the 4th plane to take it down.

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  10. I was away from my HOME BASE in California, doing consulting work in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, sitting on my hotel bed, putting on my makeup, turned on the TV and dropped my mascara and mirror...and tears ran down my face. As they are now.

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  11. it has been that very same moment (twin towers hit) that my son in law's sister died..... only 36, breast cancer. felt like a wave of grief all over, close-by in amsterdam and far away across the ocean. we zombied for the next week.

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  12. I was in an ideal retreat in Arkansas. The sky was a beautiful blue and we were packing up to spend the day with the out of state teacher before she took her plane home to her family. Walking thru the common room everyone had moved to the TV and was sitting there wondering why the 1st plane had crashed. In horror we watched the 2nd plane. There was no words just horror and tears as the events unfolded. I ran to the phone to call my children (my daughter was expecting my 1st grandchild in just a few days). The day was surreal. We took care of our visiting teacher and got her to a point halfway to meet her husband from Minnesota. A day NEVER to be forgotten.

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  13. My sister accompanied her husband to a business trip to New York City. Only a few blocks away. Back here in Nebraska we were extremely worried. I was at work, a call center for GoodYear, but the internet did not work and the phones were not ringing. It was a devastating day. Praying for our country.

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  14. My husband and I were at work in federal government buildings only 20 miles from DC. We all knew that we could be the next target and were afraid for our colleagues in the Pentagon. The wife of one of my coworkers was in Manhattan. It was all so horrible.

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  15. I was in the Charlotte airport about to board a plane to Chicago. A few minutes earlier and the plane would have been in the air and diverted to who knows where. Needless to say the flight and the conference was cancelled.
    joyecox@yahoo.com

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  16. That day and all those heroes will live forever in my heart. I was in a classroom with 36 high school students. My husband called to alert me and it was soon announced so everyone could turn on the TV. All the kids and I cried together and I tried to comfort them even when I was in shock. Grief and love.

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  17. I was helping care for my 5 day old grandson when my son-in-law called from his job to tell us of the attacks. It took a long time for the actuality of it to sink in.

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  18. I was home here on the west coast when the phone rang. I didn't catch it and my brother in law left a message just saying his daughter living in NYC was ok. I wondered so I turned on the tv and saw the violence and horror, calling my husband to come quickly. Such shock at the magnitude of it and the audacity of the people who did it. My complacency shifted that day and I was so sorry there are people who feel aggrieved to such an extreme that they felt compelled to do such cruelty to innocent people, and I wished we could love one another better throughout our beautiful world. Thank you, Bonnie, you spread the love so well.

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  19. Teaching a class for women to re-enter the workforce in small community college in Sebring, FL. The women were terrified and wanted to get to their children as soon as possible. It was a chaotic time and heartbreaking for our country.

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    1. I too am from Sebring. I work for a gastroenterologist. We were doing procedures that day. Couldn't stop as patients were prepped and kept coming in. It was so quiet, you could hear a pin drop. We till have the American flag on the window that was placed there two days after. God Bless, and thank you for teaching women to better themselves.

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  20. My son was 4 at the time and both me and my husband were at home in Asheville, NC. We had the TV on all day, watching in horror. I remember calling my college roommate, Madeline, who lived in NYC to make sure she was ok, and she was. I had to try many times to get the call to go thru. Let us never forget.

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  21. Working. Don't know how I managed to do the work. I had thought nothing could be worse than the murder of JFK. The twin towers was so much worse. I will Never Forget. The price of Freedom.

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  22. I was home in Vancouver, Washington, with my one year old and twins who had just turned 4. We were eating oatmeal. My friend from college was in St. Louis and she called me and said, "Are you watching this?" and I turned on the tv. In stunned silence, the three kids and I watched the video reel on the news over and over. Then I called my husband who was at work, and he said, "Yeah I saw a little plane hit the twin tower this morning but it was an accident." I could not believe he went to work without telling me!
    Anyway, I have visited two of the three of the Memorials, and honored the victims and prayed for them. It is such a heartbreak every year, to remember. But we have to.

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  23. We were getting ready to go to Pa . as vendors for a quilt show. My husband turned on the TV and we both sat there in shock. We did go but Paula Needlestern from NYC drove to teach classes. IT indeed was and is a sad day.

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  24. I was on vacation in England with 3 friends. We watched on the BBC. For the next week, the Brits were so wonderful to us. Flying home was a little scary.

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  25. At home near an international airport where the sky was suddenly devoid of planes. It was so unreal. There were ALWAYS planes taking off or landing but that day they were all suddenly grounded.

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  26. My husband and I were full time RV'rs. We were having some work done on the 5th wheel in Liberty, MO. All the staff as well as us were glued to the TV. The stealth bombers are based nearby and they flew over Kansas City. It was eerily quiet for such a large City. The price of gas and diesel fuel went up to over $5 a gallon in minutes. The dealership let us stay onsite and we all became like family, grieving together. That day will be forever branded in our hearts.

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  27. DH and I were on a dream tour sailing the Aegean from Istanbul to Athens with stops in Turkey one day and Greece the next. We had just returned to our cabin that beautiful fall afternoon in Rhodes, Greece and DH had turned on the TV. He saw the second plane hit and his immediate response was, "That's no accident. That is terrorism." We were immediately fearful for family and friends so far away and terrified for all those living the actual nightmare. Two members of our tour group were Pentagon employees who worked in the area where the plane struck and they expressed guilt of not being there. We too felt guilty not being on our homeland. We will never forget - ever.

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  28. My friend and I were on a tour of Great Britain. We were driving on a road (in Northern England) not far from an air base and were buzzed twice by a jet. We wondered what that was all about. Later, we arrived at a small town and we split up. I went to a yarn store and after selecting my yarn, went to the cash to pay. Ladies were talking about the event that had happened. I was confused and had to ask what in the world were they talking about. One woman in the store had a son in the second tower, but he got out safely. One of the lucky ones. After leaving the store, I passed by a truck that had the radio on and I had to stop and listen to what was happening. We didn't know if we would be able to fly back home in a few days' time as all flights out of Great Britain were postponed. It just felt that time had stopped and it still does to this day.

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  29. We were home in Las Vegas when the news came on about it. My Mom was visiting from Ok. and my Sister was there. We had just finished breakfast and I turned the tv on and saw the news. I told everyone to come see. We couldn't believe that our country was being attacked. Only later did we see all the devastation it caused. We watched it all happen as the days passed. Even now it is so sad and devastating.

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  30. My husband works for a defense contractor, and we were awakened that morning by a loud thud (we're in Texas, far from the events of the day). It turned out to be his pager falling from its shelf due to all of the vibrations caused by dozens of security messages in a row from his workplace. My kids were babies at the time, and I remember sitting in a daze of hormones and tears for a few weeks, spending hours on the phone with other moms of little kids, trying to hold it together enough to keep the kids fed and entertained.

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  31. spalmer@gmail 10:30 Mountain time.
    I was working day shift in cardiac unit at local hospital.It was very busy that morn, but as I scurried around I became aware that something was not right. So the next patient room I went into I looked up at the TV, just in time to see the jet hit the second tower. The next few days were a blur as we gathered our extra equipment, beds, iv controllers etc and signed up for the extra shifts we were sure we would need to care for the wounded survivors who would come to us. Sadly, after several days we came to realize that there were few survivors and they would not be coming to our little hospital in Delaware. It was an awful, empty, helpless, hopeless feeling.

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  32. It was my first day of work with the local fire department. We all crowded in to one office with a TV - including a crew just coming off a fire. I'll never forget the captain with tears rolling down his soot stained cheeks.

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  33. Working in an ICU in Denver. Had just come in, and someone pointed at a patient's TV .I thought it was a hoax. As reality set in, the horror of it all was overwhelming. Confused patients thought we were at war, and I couldn't tell them otherwise.

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  34. My husband was flying home from Amsterdam that day. He was already in the air when the first tower was hit. I sat at home for over six hours until I had a call from him. He landed in Montreal. Its still surreal to this day.

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    1. Have you seen "Come From Afar"...amazing stage drama. I think I cried through most of it, remembering that day. The Canadian people are so generous and caring. It was a wonderful story and saw it just 2 years ago. It never goes away.

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  35. I was on my way to Dayton, TX to celebrate the opening of a visitor center for a women's correctional facility...It was a somber day and time for our nation and the world!

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  36. I was teaching elementary art all morning. No one let me know what was going on. When I got my break at noon, I returned some books to the school library and the librarian had the TV on and all I saw was billows of smoke. I asked her what was going on (12:30 pm) and she said sarcasticaly, "Well, those were the World Trade Towers" and I passed out and hit the floor.

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  37. I had taken my daughter and a couple of friends to breakfast to celebrate one of their birthdays. When I got in the car to go home, the guy was talking about planes and buildings - none of it made sense. When I got home, I turned the TV on just before the second plane flew into the World Trade Center. I just couldn't believe what I was seeing. It appeared the plane purposely banked into a turn to hit the building! So unbelievable, and so sad. I was at work when the buildings came down, no TV's there. Prayers for the families of all those lost.

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  38. We were living in Wyoming and I was working for a local bank. We watched the horror unfold on a small TV. Our son was working for the Department of Defense and was in DC. I answered an incoming telephone call and heard three wonderful words in a voice I loved so much "hey it's me". We knew he was safe and continued to pray for the innocent lives that were taken that day. Those three words still bring tears to my eyes.

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  39. I was at work in my cubicle at Ceridian. I got a notice via email that the first plane had hit. We had no TV at work. But I had a teeny portable TV in my car, so I raced out and got it hooked up. I, along with several of my co-workers, watched the replay of both planes and then watched, in horror, as the towers fell. We were given the option to go home, which I did. The rest of the day, I was glued to the TV in tears and disbelief as the Pentagon was hit and then news about Flight 93. Terrible day...

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  40. I was at work and while getting my coffee to start the day I turned on the tv. I watched as the second plane hit the 2nd tower in horror. I knew that my bosses daughter in law worked at the World Trade Center so I ran downstairs to his sons office. Jimmy hadn't heard the news yet so I had to break it to him. It was the hardest thing I have ever had to do because I thought for sure she was at work that morning. It was the longest day ever...the entire office sat with him around the tv as we waited for news. It was six hours later that his wife called to say her train had been late and she was not at the towers when they were hit. The LIRR had stopped her train before it reached the station below the towers and she had to walk to Queens to get to a bus that could take her out of the city. Her cell phone wouldn't work, no pay phones worked so she couldn't call him until she found a gas station in Queens where their land line worked and they let her call him. It was such a blessing to hear from her and see the look of joy on his face. So many others were not so lucky. A truly tragic day in our history.

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  41. I was at my new job in Midtown Manhattan. My sis worked across the street from the towers. We didn't know if she was safe for a few hours until she was able to get in touch with my sons in Brooklyn who in turn got in touch with me. She was walking uptown to where I was so I stayed put until she made it up to me. Her clothes were covered with ash. We eventually were able to get out of the city and got home at 6 that night. I then understood how my parents and grandparents could remember exactly where they were, who they were with and how they heard the news of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. I knew I would never forget my details of 9/11.

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  42. I was at work on Ft Meade, MD, and as I walked into the Commanders office we saw the second place hit the tower. We all couldn’t believe what we were watching. Of course working on a military base we were on heightened alert not knowing if perhaps we were next. We lost people from our Command at the Pentagon. The next few days I think we all just functioned in a daze. It was so surreal!

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  43. I was visiting my family in Italy. Three of my cousins had taken me in to Milan to see Verdi's Casa Verdi and other sights. When we returned to the cousin with whom I was staying she said I couldn't go home, and I didn't understand. They had been watching TV coverage all day while I was gone. I was able to call my husband that day, but had to wait a week later than my return date to come home. It was heartwarming to feel the love and unity of all the Italians, who were outraged that this could happen.

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  44. I was at work in a dental office. We had a TV in the lunch area. The announcement came over the radio and we all, including patients, went to watch on the news. Finally we had to get back to working with our patients. I was shocked that no one cancelled that day.

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  45. I was driving to work...most of my coworkers had no idea what was happening until I arrived and turned on the television...then our phones started ringing and didn’t stop for days as we tried to get all our clients back home from their trips...we had many calls where we just listened as people told us of friends and family who lost their lives...such a sad time

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  46. I live in upstate NY. My husband worked in NYC at the time, he's an engineer and was on a project at JFK airport. He had a meeting in Manhattan that morning. I was unable to reach him, didn't really know where he was for quite some time. Thankfully he was safe and was able to leave the city to come home.

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  47. driving to work at ll bean...stopped at ymca and learned of the towers when i arrived at work....awesome planner...i *thought* i was organized but this is awesome!

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  48. Working learning a new route at the St. Marys post office.

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  49. I worked in DC, a block away from the White House. I was in the basement of one of our buildings facilitating a retreat and told the employee who came to tell us that a plane had hit the Twin Towers to go away with his silly movie story because we were doing serious work. At the first coffee break I asked one of our colleagues to go upstairs to check out the story about evacuation and I asked her to be sure to come back and not get caught up. She did come back and confirmed that two towers had been hit in NY and that everyone was evacuating. We voted to continue our retreat, but to move back across the street to our own offices and we would take the breakfast buffet with us. We decided to cross the street rather than take the tunnels through the garages because we were afraid that guards might turn us back towards the evacuation routes. Once we got to the street level and saw the chaos of hordes of people running for the metro system, and we turned on the news in our offices, we knew that our work, our retreat was no longer important. By that time the Pentagon had been hit too. Most of my colleagues started to try to go home. We were no longer allowed to take our cars out of the garages, too close to the White House, and I heard about the subway being swamped so I decided to walk home. But I stayed at work and made sure that I first wrote messages to my family in Europe and to my daughter on the West Coast. I may even have called her to tell her I was okay. My son, in Arlington,VA, did not anwer any phone. So, I walked across the bridge from DC to VA, and the smoke and smell from the Pentagon hit were really something and once I got to Rosslyn and saw that the windows had blown out in the first highrise in direct line to the Pentagon and I saw the furniture that had toppled out and heard the incessant sirens of ambulances, I knew it was horribly bad. I walked the 5 miles in semi-high heels which I had put on for the retreat. Once I got home, my son was nowhere in sight. The neighbors knew he had come home and gone out again with his car. Turns out he and his highschool buddies drove to the Pentagon but ended up mostly directing traffic at intersections. He did reach the Pentagon and took pictures but they were all bad.
    I, like so many others, just watched re-runs. But eventually, I stopped that for my mental health as it was bringing back all the memories of the US Embassy being bombed in Nairobi (I was there) and the "what if" the White House had been hit, would I be alive?
    So, it is day that indeed, I will remember in very many small and exact details, like the look on the face of a colleague with his small child that he retrieved from the on-site day care and as he was trying to move through the throngs of people towards the metro. It took them untold hours to get home.

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  50. I had just started a new job as the textbook manager in the college store, at the same college where my husband still works. The store was in the basement and got terrible TV/radio reception, so when events began to unfold, I kept running upstairs to the TV in the student center to get updates. Had to try to interpret what I was seeing for the student workers still on staff downstairs. I wasn't much older than they were, but I had to try to be the grown-up and keep them calm.

    It seemed so unreal and incomprehensible to me, sort of distant and numb, until Peter Jennings stopped coping for a few minutes. He'd been this unflappable rock of calm stability, no matter how awful the news story, for nearly my entire childhood and adolescence. I was handling it okay until he stopped handling it, if that makes sense. So many gut-wrenching memories from that day, and I wasn't even directly or personally involved in any way. I try to put it in context for my kids, try to give them some sense of just how huge and awful it was, but I don't know if anyone who wasn't alive that day will ever fully grasp that.

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  51. I was interviewing candidates for a position in the office that I managed. After finishing with the first candidate and walking her out, I was pulled aside by one of the nurses to tell me that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center. Patients coming in were talking all about it. I took the second candidate for interview. Of course we all know now what I would learn at the end of that interview. We saw all of our patients that day, but all were extremely upset as they came and left. Those of us on staff were numbed by what we were told. It wasn't until each of us got home that night that we were faced with the reality of the terror. I was in high school the day that JFK was assassinated and that whole nightmare has been permanently etched in my mind. Unfortunately, I now have two such nightmares carved into my memory. I must say, though, that the terror of the second is so much worse than the first. I was proud of how our nation pulled into complete unity after 9/11. I yearn for all of us to find that kind of unity again. Living in Pennsylvania, I have been to the crash site in Shanksville twice. The park and memorial that have been developed are beyond 5 star quality. I wholeheartedly encourage people to visit there if at all possible.

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  52. I was on my way to the office from an off site meeting and turned on the car radio. I heard a plane had struck a building in New York City. I thought it was probably a small plane that went off course. When I reached the office, I had to go into another meeting. By the end of that meeting, I was told about the horrible events that happened that morning. We turned on the TV in the meeting room and watched the coverage together. Work stopped while we watched and mourned. Such heart wrenching visions...

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  53. I was a commander in Alexandria VA police department. We mobilized to assist at the Pentagon for 4 weeks. Months later, some of us visited Ground Zero in NYC and grieved with officers there. A friend was lost on that day. For me it will always be a moment to remember and honor those who were killed, and to offer love and respect to their survivors.

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  54. I was at a craft camp sponsored by our local Home Extension. I was many miles and a couple of hours from home. Since that day I sit and watch every 9/ll remembrance that is shown on this day. I will never forget.

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  55. I want to thank you for sharing your stories. I sat and read every one. I commented a little on someone's memory, she is from my city. I work in a gastroenterology office, (I am still there). We were scheduled to do procedures that day, colonoscopy etc. I had a voice mail from my dad, went to tell the office manager, who was hanging up from a call from her mom. She sent someone to turn on the TV's in the waiting room, and the exam rooms. And at that moment the office went silent except for the machines in the endoscopy suite. The laughter of the patient's stopped, the story telling, the comments and jokes, and you could hear a pin drop. About every 10 minutes someone would go to one of the TV's then make the rounds of those of us in the office part,catch us up. The RNs/LPNs would catch up when they took a patient into a room, between procedures we would catch the doctor up.He had a new doc that had started in July, the doc was from Iran. That doc was doing rounds in hospital. Once we understood what was happening there was no more noise, patients still came in, TO our surprise. Many were prepped and it seemed that they just didn't know what to do. My sister, who also worked in the office, had taken the day off, her birthday was the 10th, sh was in Ft. Myers. She got out just before they locked the city down. We lived together w/ our parents, when I finally got off work, I was able to catch up on the videos and the news casts. We watched TV until Midnight. No one we knew was involved, but just knowing our country had been targeted in such a way was and is heartrending. A week or so after a disgruntled employee turned in a local physician who happened to be Muslim. She claimed he was a supporter. The FBI came to our little county took his records, computers, charts, and interviewed every employee. He was NOT a supporter, nor involved, and was eventually exonerated. That tor up our little town. Every year I remember, where I was, what I was doing. I promise I will NEVER forget.

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  56. My husband and I weren in California, just north of San Francisco. He was there on business and I was sightseeing. He got up early to shower, eat breakfast and catch the shuttle to a meeting. I turned the tv on and learned that the first tower had just been hit. Shortly the second tower was struck. He didn’t want to leave for work but had to. I sat in our hotel room nearly all day in stunned silence watching. I left the room once to find something to eat but hurried back. Those memories are burned into my mind and I remember those feelings every year.

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  57. I live in the uk and was at school Collecting my children when the news broke all the parents were in disbelief and when we got home and turned on the news I was horrified at what I was seeing.
    My hear still breaks for all who lost their lives, and the heroic actions of all who helped and worked to help the survivors. Such a sad sad day prayers and love to all xx

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  58. I was teaching kindergarten at a school in Newport News, Virginia. It was time for music class, so the music teacher came to my room. I went to the office to check my mailbox and saw on the office tv the first tower burning. I asked a secretary what had happened, and she said that a plane had hit the World Trade Center tower. I pictured a small, "puddle jumper" plane. She said, with horror on her face, "No it was an airliner, a big jet!" Stunned, I returned to my classroom and was informed a little later that the other tower had also been hit. We were told there were other planes that had been hijacked, and one seemed to be heading toward Washington DC. No one really knew how many planes had been hijacked, and we were in the flight path toward DC. I spent the morning listening for the roar of jet engines and desperately worrying how I could possibly protect that classroom hold of innocent 5-year-olds... When we were finally released, I returned home and my husband also came home shortly afterward. We spent the afternoon and into the evening sitting on the couch, watching a replay of the planes hitting the towers and hoping against hope for news of survivors.

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  59. My husband (who had just retired) and I were stationed at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs. I heard the news report of the first plane hitting the twin towers on NPR as I was getting ready to leave for work. Our office ran a program called Space and Missile Pioneers - we had honorees and their spouses (who were in their 70s and 80s) scheduled to arrive from all over the US that day, those coming in from the east coast were already in the air. I was able to contact the Pioneers on the west coast while they were still at home to tell them we were cancelling the event. The Pioneers who were already on flights were diverted all over the country. I spent the rest of the day trying to help them as best I could. My boss had a TV in his office, so I was able to see some of the news coverage. Everyone had friends or colleagues stationed at the Pentagon. It was a truly horrible day.

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  60. I was working in Eastport, NL, Canada. Because we are in an earlier time zone I didn’t find out until I went to my 90 year old grandmother’s house to have lunch with her. We sat and watched and cried. Within minutes the runway at our nearest airport in Gander NL started to fill up as North American airspace was shut down.

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  61. I was working as a parapro in a kindergarten classroom. We received the news as the kids were picking out books in the library. The teacher and I had to pretend everything was ok while we were receiving the devastating news all morning. The afternoon class came in and we were concerned about one little boy's dad who was a pilot for Delta. He said his dad was ok. What a relief! My husband and I spent a lot of hours watching the tv trying to make sense of what had happened. My oldest son is now a pilot and I think about this incident a lot when he is flying. We will never forget that day.

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  62. Exercising with a low impact aerobic VHS tape in my living room. I never played the tape again.

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  63. We were living in California - our children were grown. I didn't sleep well in those days, and was always up very early. Our son called & said "do you have the TV on?". I turned it on and watched while talking to him. I remember him asking me "what does this mean?", and remember my reply "someone has declared war on the United States - we just don't know who the enemy is yet." I felt that the government probably had a good idea, but they wouldn't release the information till it was confirmed. There was some spots of good that came from those terrifying days -- the patriotism shown by Americans, the kindness that was freely shown, those who helped others -- I'll never forget those examples of humanity, when none of us knew what might happen next. I never forget those who didn't make it home or their loved ones either...so many lives changed forever.

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  64. I live within 20 miles of Flight 93, been there several time so quiet and peaceful. I can still remember 9 11 like it was yesterday.

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  65. I was at work in a small lab at a big hospital in Atlanta. We had a small black and white TV, which we turned on when we heard about the first plane. I can still feel the horror and disbelief, as I read about all these experiences and tears run down my face. It is a pain that has never really left us. My route home from the hospital ran in plain view of a couple of flight paths of the Atlanta airport, usually so busy that they were coming and going almost constantly. The complete absence of any air traffic on that ride home was so eerie to me, almost like another world.

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  66. I want the planner!!! I need the planner!!!
    On 9/11, I was home doing my housewife things when my mom called and said, "Turn on your TV. The US has been attacked!". I sat and cried as I watched the World Trade Center burn. My heart also hurts every time I think of it. Hopefully, someday, there will be healing between the religions instead of hating. God Bless Us All.

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  68. I just got a string quilt book of yours... Can't wait to dive in. Still haven't finished Idaho Square Dance though. Hope your day is good.

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  69. Husband and I were on our way to work on I-35 when the news came across KRLD. Each office in which we worked accomplished nothing that day except acknowledgement of our horror at this incident.

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  70. I was at work at the hospital I am an RN we were just finishing up our shift duties when the supervisor told us to turn on a TV. All the staff stopped and just stared at the TV it was unbelievable. I called home and told my family to turn on the TV, we were all crying, the off going staff, the oncoming staff, and my family. I cried my whole 30 minute drive home while listening to the radio. It was so silent and scarcely anyone on the road during rush hour. When I got home I just hugged and held onto my daughters and husband not wanting to let them go. It still brings tears to my eyes thinking of all the losses that day. Loss of lives, loss of feeling secure, and loss of feeling safe. I will never forget that day.

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  71. I owned an embroidery business at that time and my landlord came in and wanted to know if I had a radio and he asked me to turn it to an AM station because he had heard that someone had bombed the twin towers in NYC. We listened for quite a while and were both in disbelief. Such a sad day.

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  72. My husband called from school to get his sister’s work number. She was nursing administrator for the NJ hospital across from the Towers. Then he called his brother in Lodi, NJ & told him not to go outside because of air quality. I spent most of the day in front of the TV in ND. The picture of the Towers before the planes hit was just like the one we took from NJ by the hospital/nursing home visiting my MIL at Christmas 2000. She died January 2001. A very sad year for many people.

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  73. My husband called from school to get his sister’s work number. She was nursing administrator for the NJ hospital across from the Towers. Then he called his brother in Lodi, NJ & told him not to go outside because of air quality. I spent most of the day in front of the TV in ND. The picture of the Towers before the planes hit was just like the one we took from NJ by the hospital/nursing home visiting my MIL at Christmas 2000. She died January 2001. A very sad year for many people.

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  74. My husband called from school to get his sister’s work number. She was nursing administrator for the NJ hospital across from the Towers. Then he called his brother in Lodi, NJ & told him not to go outside because of air quality. I spent most of the day in front of the TV in ND. The picture of the Towers before the planes hit was just like the one we took from NJ by the hospital/nursing home visiting my MIL at Christmas 2000. She died January 2001. A very sad year for many people.

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  75. I was at DFW airport seeing my mom and her new husband off on their honeymoon, they closed the airport and told everyone to pick up their luggage and leave the airport. Heard one man talking on his phone that a plane had been hijacked. Heard on the radio exactly what had happened. Spent the day at home with the tv on. I was so dumbfounded that I didn't even make it to work that day.

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  76. Hi Bonnie:
    I had stayed overnight w/ my boyfriend of many years, as his place was closer to my work. I was getting ready for work as a correctional officer, our neighbor came to tell us to turn on the TV, so we got to see the second plane hitting the towers, later the Pentagon flight. I was called back to Active Duty because off this. I spent the next 8 years working on exercises for deploying troops, then designing the computer based combat battle simulated exercises based on where the units were deployed to, what their mission was. I was deployed three times, volunteered for all three missions.

    Now, I try to keep my creative juices a flow, and working in different directions, as I finally got to retire from the military in 2010, after 36 years. I would love to win this planner, as I need to get organized! If not, I will order it along with the other book. I tried to order a couple weeks ago, but I couldn't get the site to work.

    Donna E.
    Kasilof, AK
    Where it is raining like cats and dogs today!

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