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Saturday, March 28, 2020

March 2020 Quilty Box Gift-Away!


March has only a few days left -

So let’s ride it out in STYLE!

The March 2020 showed up on my door step the day before yesterday – and it was such a happy diversion!

I couldn’t wait to open it up and see what is inside.  SUMMER COLORS!  Weeee!

This month’s box is curated by Sarah Elizabeth Sharp of No Hats in the House!

No Hats?


I loved learning about Sarah!

"No hats in the house" is an expression I often heard growing up.  (That, along with sayings like, "No whistling in the house," or "Only kings lick their plates!").  Over the years, my siblings and I have simply grown accustomed to—among other things—removing our hats indoors.  

My mom tells us these idiosyncrasies originate from my father's father.  As fate would have it, I was named for his mother (my great-grandmother Sarah), whose affinity for quilting I also seem to have inherited.  So the sentimental dreamer in me likes to think that perhaps the "no hats" rule stood in her house, too.


But the raison d'ĂȘtre for {no} hats as it relates to "No hats...!" is a bit abstract.  To be honest, I didn't realize that other households imposed more lenient hat-wearing policies—if at all!—until the day my then-boyfriend (now-husband) innocently failed to remove his ball cap at the front door.  

It felt a little off to me, but I let him in (gasp!).  One lecture later, he now knows my parents' official stance on hats in the house.

The point is, in all aspects of my life, I have undeniably been shaped by the traditional features of my upbringing.  That influence in my sewing manifests itself in my pronounced preference for symmetry and repetition.  

Still, that's not to say I can't bend the rules from time to time (did I mention I never made curfew?).  In that sense, {no} hats (read: hatless-ness optional) honors those traditional roots while embracing whatever happens to come of my unbridled creative spirit.

Welcome to my world.  Feel free to leave your hat {on} at the door ;)

Learn more on Sarah's website HERE.

What has Sarah got for us in this month’s Quilty Box?


16 gorgeous fat eighths from her line Untamed.


The colors of summer to come!


A 6 piece Jolt Acrylic Set

A Fiskars 28mm rotary cutter

Aurifil thread

Bundles of Inspiration Magazine -


And the Jolt Quilt pattern!

The bundles of Inspiration magazine also includes:


4 ring wall hanging by Paper Pieces.

(paper templates for EPP purchased separately)


Modern LeMoyne Star

By Pineapple Fabrics


Wild Sky Mini Quilt by Jeni Baker.

Perfect for using your Untamed Fat Eighth bundle!

What is a Quilty Box?

Here are some highlights to keep in mind:

  • Quilty Box is a monthly subscription box of fun quilting supplies. We offer plans from $44-48/mo.
  • 5% of the profits of multi-month subscriptions are donated to Quilts for Kids - a non-profit which donates quilts for children in need
  • Each month we have 4 or more products (fabric, patterns, thread, or notions)
  • Our retail value of the products in the box is always more than $60
  • We will be using the hashtags #QuiltyBox and #GetQuilty

Subscribe today at Quilty Box!

I LOVE the fact that 5% of the profits go to Quilts for Kids!  It’s a win win all the way around!

Who wants to win this box?

We will draw for our winner on Wednesday, April 1st!

While you are registering here – did you know we also have an IronEz gift Away happening on Tuesday’s Post? The Folks at IronEz are offering up THREE of their ironing board caddies with spray bottles – one each for 3 lucky winners.  That drawing happens tomorrow so head on over and get your entry in.

You can also save 15% using coupon code BH15off ordering from IronEZ directly!  You’ll input the code on the checkout page.

Get two or three while you are at it.  You are going to LOVE keeping those spray bottles in line and off of your ironing surface.

I love that it fits and corrals a multitude of favorite bottle sizes – and the free bottle that comes with it has even a finer mist than the traditional trigger spray on Best Press.
It will also hold an aerosol spray starch can, Flatter spray, or many beverage bottles – keep it near your machine and remember to HYDRATE!


And while we are all making the most of social distancing:



I have placed my stock of the Addicted to Scraps book on deep deep discount at just $15.99 (regularly $27.95) and it comes with a free PDF pattern download for my Wanderlust Table Runner.

If you've been waiting for this book - now is the time. Put your stash to good use while you retreat away at home.

You'll find it in the Quiltville Store along with other goodies you may want to add to your cart - check the NEW category to see what else we've added.

And now for those who missed YESTERDAY’S Big Announcement!



THIS BEGINS MONDAY!

Read yesterday’s post and catch up.

All the info I have given so far is there.

Details on fabric, colors, yardage, etc will hopefully be ready tomorrow.  So come back tomorrow for more info.

I am doing this on the fly.  I have not made this quilt myself yet.  I will be sewing just a few days ahead of everyone else – it’s going to be a frenzy of fun! 

Because there is nothing like a global pandemic to push us into quilt madness!


Quiltville Quote of the Day

Vintage orphan block quilt found in North Carolina.

Sometimes you've just got to pick up the pieces and go with it.

Things might turn out better than you ever hoped they would!

Have a lovely Saturday, folks!





25 comments:

  1. I just finished two orphan quilts. I was amazed at how well they turned out. Looking forward to your quilt-along.

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  2. Wow this is a first for me as I never get to be first. In the land of Borg, I would be 3of4(huge Trekkie fan) anyway, I can't wait for the start of the new quilt along. So today is earmarked for rearranging my bedroom so I can set up a quilting space. Huge task, but it has to be done. I had been hoping to get some mystery fabric pulled today from my stash but tomorrow is just a sunrise away.

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  3. Good Morning Bonnie. Enjoy your blog so much. Thank you. I read it every morning as I drink my morning coffee. How is puppy this morning?. Better I hope. Take Care. Be safe and healthy

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  4. My rotary cutter is ready to roll!

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  5. I was taught that men (and boys) took off their hats indoor. Ladies keep them on. I sometimes (usually) miss the structure of old days.

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  6. How 'bout "no elbows on the table" ? That was a favorite of my mom's, raising 4 girls !

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  7. I’m looking forward to the quilt along as I enter my fourth week of no school, with our break joined by shelter in place. I’m curious if you are named after your great great grandma Sarah (also my great grandma’s name), was Bonnie her middle name or is Sarah part of your name?

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  8. I am totally into the mystery quilts. Being new to your blog ,this will be a great way to be introduced into your world. Can monday come sooner?

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  9. I too came from a "hats off in the house" family -- but that was back LONG before boys wore ball caps unless they were...playing ball. And yes, ladies kept their hats on if visiting for tea or Bridge Club or whatever...well, that went by the wayside when I was a kid (early 1960s) but we still kept them on in church -- and women today, if wearing anything but a toque (which would be too hot to leave on) still often leave their hats on in church -- especially at a wedding! Looking forward to more QAL detais! Thank you for all you do!

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  10. It is always no hats indoors. My family lived by that rule when I was growing up , but I don't think I ever heard it spoken. It was just proper manners. Then I married a career Marine and to this day, military men are "uncovered" indoors. It's just proper etiquette.

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  11. Hats off in our house was standard when I was growing up. Not so anymore.

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  12. No hats went by the wayside with 5 grandsons.My new rule is leave your cellphone in the car!








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    1. I too remember the "no hats in the house"as an unspoken thing here in Oz.
      On the other hand, it was a VERY definitely spoken thing to have "No hats at the table", which doesn't seem to register at all with some of today's younger people.

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  13. I made the last blocks for Garden Party from your lovely class in Phoenix in January. I'll start assembly tomorrow. Perfect timing for the quilt-a-long. Stay safe.

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  14. Such lovely fabrics, so bright and cheerful. Looking forward to tomorrow’s mystery I’ve never made a medallion quilt before, so excited to be trying something new.
    Hope ZoeyJo is feeling better.
    Take care
    Love and quilty hugs
    Anne xxx

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  15. I too am looking forward to quilting together on Monday. As far as I know, men and boys should still remove hats when indoors, especially in church. Women and girls can keep headwear on and in Roman Catholic Churches the expectation is that females cover their heads. Remember Jacky Kennedy meeting the Pope? Cynthia, self-isolating in Trentham, England.

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  16. What a happy box of goodies!

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  17. My father in law used "No Hats at the Table". And, he enforced it by knocking it off! LOL!

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  18. I am ready for summer colors. Yummy.

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  19. I had only sisters and we had no rule regarding hats. My grandmother had some ideas though. She insisted you should not drink milk when eating fruit. My dad would always say "what about cherry vanilla ice cream?" She also insisted the first person to enter the house after midnight on New Year's Eve had to be a man. That was supposed be bring financial luck to the house the next year. I know it is ridiculous and sexist, but I still insist either my husband or son step outside and then step back in at midnight. It's an homage to a great grandmother. A former co-worker told me she was an adult before she learned that in other families children left milk and cookies for Santa. In her family, Santa got pretzels and scotch. Each family has their own wacky ways.

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  20. My dad was not one to ever wear hats so there was never anything said at my house. My Grandma's house was a different story!

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  21. Beautiful fabrics, just a reminder that spring is around the corner.

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  22. I'm that crazy substitute teacher that has to keep reminding kids to take off their hat or hood in the school -- school dress code rules (for safety). Safety first!

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