>>>>

Sunday, May 06, 2012

Antique Quilt Sightings!

I’ve seen some BEAUTIES this trip! And I’ll be on the look out for more – in fact, I have an appointment on Tuesday morning on my way home ---in New Paltz!

You know, it’s amazing the people you meet when you think you are just out there minding your own business and doing your own thing.

Yesterday, after the lecture, Carolynn asked if I’d like to grab a bite of lunch in the school cafeteria ----let’s just say that my healthy choice of chef’s salad was balanced out by my UN-healthy choice of the hugest Black/White cookie EVER! But I needed it ;c)

The day was really beautiful outside, and we spotted an empty bench at a table, and we joined a goup of ladies who were also lunching. Introductions and conversations led to me discovering that one of my new lunch friends was the director of Exhibits, educational and public programs for historic Huguenot Street, a national historic landmark district in New Paltz, NY!

We spent quite a bit of time talking about the fabulous antique quilts in the collection, and she invited me over for a private tour! OOOHHHHH! YOU BETCHA! So I have that to look forward to on Tuesday as I begin my drive home. I hope she will let me do a blog post with photos ----from what she was saying, I’m in for a treat!

I’ve come to realize that I really DO live in a hotbed of antique quilt affordability in NC. The farther north I go, the rarer these beautiful treasures are, and they can get costly. At this point I’m just glad that photos are FREE – and let’s face it --- we certainly can NOT buy them ALL! Where would I put them?! ((That space is being occupied by machines! LOL!)

The simple blue chambray and shirting 9 patch variation in the top photo of this post was $450.00 It was a very nice quilt but not extremely early ---and the trend continued through the antique mall with prices just being….REALLY!? It’s not that I don’t think the quilts are worth that --- of course they are. They are worth far more than that if we really want to talk about time and effort, but just much more than what I am used to in my area.

yardsalesaturday 043

Just a simple burgundy and white sugar bowl variation. This would be a cool one for setting an alternate block in that wide open space, wouldn’t it?

yardsalesaturday 046

Double wedding rings are always classic. I loved the mix of fabrics in this one --- not just florals and pretty things, it had plaids and stripes and everythig under the sun. Fabrics are from about 1950.

Speaking of Double Wedding Ring – did you register to win the free Double Wedding Ring package from Inklingo yet? Click to THIS POST to read about it, and click the icon in the post to get you to the right spot! You’ve got a week to register, and it’s a great give-away!

yardsalesaturday 044

1930’s Flower Garden!

I have lots of questions on how I’m going to finish the edges of my hexie quilt. Here’s one way! Do you see how she filled in the sides of the quilt with half flowers? And then the whole thing is apliqued to a solid blue border….this is one way of preserving that picot edge.

yardsalesaturday 045

The quilting on this one was really nice ----what’s not to like about blue and white with a bit of yellow? YUMMY!

yardsalesaturday 050

Here’s another flower garden with a BOUND edge…yes, there is separate binding that goes around each and every side of those outside hexagons! I don’t want to think about how long this took…but this maker did a super job as well. Those hexes are hand quilted 1/4” or so from every seam in every hexagon. WOW!

yardsalesaturday 048

Can you see that texture? I thought the beige color was interesting ---

yardsalesaturday 051

Here you can see the binding against the backing fabric --- it does give a nice finish.

As for my hexie quilt? I’ll deal with it when I get there. I have a feeling I’m going to just turn the backing in to meet the edge of the hexagons and blind stitch it closed – it won’t have binding at all….it will just END. That’s a “knife edge” finish. I’ve done it before and it works well. Not every quilt needs a formal binding.

yardsalesaturday 052

This one was fairly shredded…..hanging on a room divider screen. LOVE the double pinks…and the positivie/negative thing going on. At first I thought it was shoo-fly blocks with sashing, but look again! It’s X blocks in positive/negative set on point! It’s how the corners of the blocks come together that clued me in --- do you see it? What a sweet traditional quilt.

yardsalesaturday 056

Drunkard’s Path units are so versatile! I love how graphic this is in two fabrics. But you’d have to shoot me before I’d ever make one! I’ve GOT to have more fabrics going into a quilt than just TWO!

yardsalesaturday 047

A sweet dresden plate in 30’s prints. Love the plate blade border….don’t they look like neck ties? :cD

yardsalesaturday 057

Simple squares on point…..this is somewhere between 1920 and 1930 --- not a lot of florals, mostly solids and shirting stripes and plaids. Love the coral and purple together! This would be SUCH a great quilt in two colors as well…..SIMPLE and simply awesome!

yardsalesaturday 058

What’s not to love about classic bow-ties! I love these whenever I see them, but early turn-of-the-century ones with their plaids and stripes and mourning prints and burgundy resists and indigos --- LOVE LOVE LOVE!

yardsalesaturday 066

Beautiful lone star in wonderful solids!

yardsalesaturday 072

Isn’t this pattern called something like “Old Grey Goose” or similar? I love how this looks when the blocks are turned – asymmetrical blocks are a favorite for me. But do you see how that one block looks so different from the others? The goose units are turned upside down and the center hour-glass unit is rotated --- was that intentional? Did it mean something to the maker? We will ever know! This one had REALLY GREAT fan quilting ---

yardsalesaturday 070

What I really loved about this one was the pink plaid backing that was also folded to the front as binding. Just a bit of something unsuspected because the quilt was so black/red on the front! I love backing surprises!

And you know, there is always one thing that does NOT come home with me. I wish this one could have --- but the wiring was SO brittle ---

yardsalesaturday 054

It says BAMBERGER’S on it!

I was curious enough to do a search on Bambergers --- it was a huge department store in Newark NJ ---eventually bought by Macy’s. This is a “badged” machine --- meaning it was made by another company, but sports the name of Bambergers on it as its “brand”. It’s likely a japanese singer knock-off. It was only $25, but I knew it would take a fortune to rewire it and I"m still waiting for "Joe Cool" to be rewired. ((Yes, I hear my treadle-on friends saying – JUST TREADLE IT and no wiring would be needed!!)) But doesn’t that badge look SO 1950s?!

Am I going to regret not picking this one up for $25? I checked..under that dust and grime she is beautiful and shiny --- oh --- sigh ----

I’m about to head off to the Somer’s Show for my lecture this morning ----a bit more vendors mall shopping ---and tomorrow is a “Jared Takes A Wife” workshop --- and in between it all, I’m getting closer to having those Nearly Insane blocks knocked out!

Happy Sunday, Everyone! I’ve got some drawing to do this evening!

There is still time to register for the Quiltmaker 100 Blocks vol 5 as well by clicking HERE!

I think this is a record --- there are 859 comments as I type this post! WOW!

Tomorrow Eve I’ll be drawing for the winners of Pat Sloan’s “Focus On The Center” book ---if you haven’t registered yet, go leave a comment on that post!

19 comments:

  1. Bamberger's, aka Bam's, was a major department store. Then Macy's bought it out. Everybody shopped at Bam's. For the longest time, people would refer to Macy's as Bam's.
    Ruth in NJ

    ReplyDelete
  2. While at a quilt show in Port St. Lucie, Florida this past winter I saw an AMAZING finish on a double wedding ring! I took lots of pictures because it was so neat! I can send them to you if you want. Bwills91@charter.net

    ReplyDelete
  3. OOOOOOO how lovely they all are... and the blue/yellow hexies!!! I might have to make one... in my spare time.... between two and four in the morning.....

    thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love reading all your adventures it is like a great mystery series. My favorite of all those quilts would be the flower garden with the beige center. How adorable it is.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lucky you to see the quilts in New Paltz! I really hope you get to take photos and blog about it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love that flower garden with the green backing. That was a popular color also - my grandma had started an applique quilt and that green was one of the main colors.

    ReplyDelete
  7. You get to see lots of beautiful quilts on your travels! I don't know if I'd be able to go all the time and not bring something home with me. I'd run out of space way to quickly!!

    Have fun today at your appointment!!

    Kathy T in KS

    ReplyDelete
  8. The blue and white hexi with just a touch of yellow was inspiring. Hope you are able to take pics in New Paltz. ..mtgranny@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank you for showing the edges of those hexagon quilts! I have a grandmothers flower garden I have been wondering how to finish when I get there. My question has been how did everyone else do it. I'm happy to see it varies in the past as much as it does today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope you see my responce to Bonnie and read how I finished mine.

      Delete
  10. Interesting antique show Bonnie thanks :0)
    the block you are calling "old grey goose" is the same layout as the
    block Randy is giving us called battleground variation today over at her Sow along.....I think so anyway :0).

    Have a wonderful time enjoying NY
    and Happy Sewing

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love the new block. Winning the magazine would make missing your class at Smith Mountain Lake a little easier to handle. I really missed your class. I got sick. I have been reading your blog for a long time and feel that I know you from your blog.
    Sharon Didio
    sdidio@cox.net

    ReplyDelete
  12. Bonnie I have an idea on how to finish your Hexie quilt. Just make more Hexies and sew them to the back side. I looks really good when you have a solid color backing, ( I know you don't do solid but) it really looks good when it is done. I did mine in groups of 5 and attached them to the quilt then did 5 more and so on. It turned out great and it added color to the back and I didn't have to finish it with a knife edge, which I am bad at anyway. Hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Love the vicarious antique shopping, Bonnie. This one was especially fun. I'm a huge fan of two-color quilts and those in particular spoke to me. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  14. OOoooh, beautiful quilts! If I'd been there the blue and yellow hexagon quilt would of been coming home with me! I guess I better start saving my pennies to buy an antique quilt as a remembrance of the trip if I should ever make it from AK to the east coast.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks so much for sharing these wonderful quilts! I love the bowtie one :0) How exciting to have a private tour of the New Paltz collection. I do hope she'll let you post some pictures!! Pass along to her how grateful so many of us who live far away will be to see these quilts.

    ReplyDelete
  16. This was a real feast for the eyes, I love antique quilts and saw some lovely welsh ones at an antiques fair, I love the double wedding ring the dresden plate but I think my favourites will always be grandmothers garden, so beautiful, thank you so much for sharing these wonderful quilts with us.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I got my very first credit card from Bambergers!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Anonymous7:10 PM EDT

    I love the "hexis" and thanks for showing them. Since the book, "Mosiac Quilts" was out of print, I ordered it through interlibrary loan at our local library. I only have it for one week, have enjoyed reading it and viewing the quilts. Aren't they something?
    Anita in Abq.

    ReplyDelete

Did you know that ad space on this blog provides for all of the free patterns and free mysteries and challenges at no cost to you?

Thank you for understanding the many hours that go into this blog every day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. :)