Wednesday, May 06, 2009

For Chrisee..


Chrisee asked in her blog comment about what is "allowed" on planes now, and I tried to reply to her privately, but when I clicked reply, I got the dreaded "noreply@blogger.com" address. Urgh.

I still think it's a valid question, some might find interesting! I had more trouble getting back FROM Canada to the USA when I flew last month (was it ONLY last month??)than I have had going anywhere within the US or from the US to Canada.

Before going though Customs in Winnipeg, I was told ALL scissors would be confiscated. So I quickly took my sewing kit out of my carry on and put it in my checked bag, and just read a book on the way back to the states.

But travel within the US? Small thread snips are allowed, needles are no problem, and no one has even questioned my seam ripper (a tiny brass one) that I use for removing the basting stitches from my small hand quilting project.

My little travel bag consists of thread, a needle book with needles, small thread snips, thimble, and that small seam ripper. If you don't want to take the whole spool of thread due to space shortage, wind thread on a bobbin! That helps save space.

My hoop is 12". It's not huge, but it's not tiny. It's big enough for me to work with the space I'm given on a plane without it going past the arm rests and into someone else's lap, which is always a consideration when flying coach! This little quilt is only 28" square. I don't like to fly with much over 36". It's just too much to deal with.

That said, I do find lots of opportunity to quilt at layovers in between flights, during flights....if we have to be to the airport 1.5 to 2 hours early, bringing a project can really put that time to good use!

I do keep a book with me as well, because sometimes stitching does NOT work out. Right now I'm going retro..I'm reading a novel by Ayn Rand first published in 1957. The title is "Atlas Shrugged". The idea for writing the book came to her in 1943.

It's amazing the fore sight she had, because what I'm reading sounds so much like what society has done in our day! And it's fun to read the nuances and words of that time period. Gay still meant happy then! :cD And references to things like "straigtening the seams at the back of her stocking...." I love that era in movies, so it is fun to read it in this book too. Not for the faint of heart, it's about 1000 pages.....

And with the mention of this book, I must add the following question "Who is John Galt??" (Read the book if you want to know!)

18 comments:

Country Log Cabin Quilter said...

I recently flew to Oregon for a 4 hour flight on American Airlines and when I checked the rules, it said that you can take a scissors with a 4" or less blade. So I did take some scissors like that, needles and some embroidery. I had no problem. I think those directives are from TSA. I got the Gail Pan BOM for March finished on the flight!

Michele's Quilting Journey said...

I loved 'Atlas Shrugged'...back in the day! As for TSA and traveling...my blog is FILLED with my nightmere stories of travel to and from Alaska. From our carry-on Brie (cheese) and Polenta (cornmeal) being read as an orange plastique bomb to my antique silver rosaries (in chain mail pouches)causing TSA fits, to my seat being taken and no empty ones in sight, to no room for even one carry-on, to 3 months of hearing loss after a failed wheel flaps landing greeted by 5 firetrucks...my life is high drama, white knuckle flying all the way! I once had to change planes 3x before we even left the runway!

Boy, I would love to just sit and read or sew. But I spend all my time getting my breathing slowed down and my baro-trauma earplugs put in and out ;)

AllyJo said...

My daughter and husband just finished Atlas Shrugged and I'm next. They said it was awesome. I can't wait.

thanks for the flying tips. I was going to crochet on the plane once, but since I only use my grandma's crochet hook, I chickened out. I couldn't bear to lose it. I learned to crochet with it when I was 6 years old.

Lynn said...

good flying tips...I also took knitting needles on board from Calif to MN. And small fold up scissors.

Lee said...

going through Canadian customs can often be trying. However,I have also had many strange request with US customs too. If you still want to sew and carry something to cut your threads with, then might I suggestion a product from 'Clover'. It is called the "Thread Cutter Pendant". It is about the size of dollar coin and can be hung on a ribbon and worn like a pendant. It has 6 or so grooves around it to cut the threads. Retails for about $8USD. check your LQS for one. Happy flying and sewing!

Melodie said...

I read a great travel tip somewhere making an emergency sewing kit out of a large dental floss container. Put as many bobbins of thread in it as will fit, plus a couple of needles, and maybe a safety pin or two. Use the cutter on the floss container to cut your thread.
For quilting you could use the same color thread, skip the buttons and safety pins. You'd probably would have to use snips later to clip the threads closer to the quilt, but TSA does allow dental floss containers. No risk of having your scissors taken.

YankeeQuilter said...

For a long time I carried a small child's scissors that was more plastic then metal and barely cut thread. Then last year I was pulled aside for a bag search...you would think it was stilletto! The security guard was screaming! oh, well...not like that hasn't happened before. I used a plastic knife from the lunch box to cut my threads instead and it worked better!

Amy said...

Ooo, Atlas Shrugged is one of my favorite books of all time. I got my brother to read it when we were in college 30 years ago, and car pooling to our summer jobs. We had a great book discussion in the car for the week it took him to read it. And I refused to answer the question, "Who is John Galt?" I didn't want to give it away!

Beth said...

I have recently traveled with: scissors (remember the old school scissors with the blunt tip?), fingernail clippers, seam ripper, knitting needles and numerous pins and needles. Last summer I took my Featherweight sewing machine (w/o needle) and the TSA guy NEVER opened that bag. He was more interested in my small electronic converter...and THEN he just wanted to know where I got it! I try to act nonchalant and bored, like I know JUST what I'm doing
..and ZIP ..I'm thru... Knitting needles made of bamboo or plastic crochet hooks can be a good investment just for travel. I'm LOST without some kind of hand work. I usually take MANY!

Kindred Crafters said...

I'm reading Atlas Shurgged right now, too! I really love Ayn Rand's writing. Have read 3 of her other books and could not put them down. I am having a harder time committing to Atlas Shrugged, but only due to it's size, not it's content!

sewprimitive karen said...

Anthem by Ayn Rand is one fantastic book.

woolywoman said...

Knitters carry a dental floss box and use the floss cutter as a yarn cutter. Works for embroidery thread, too. Hope your mom is appreciative of the gift! And, I hope that your family realizes what a gem you are!

debby said...

I know who John Galt is!

I have a list of books that I try to read every year. This is on it, as well as everything by Jane Austen. Some books are just like old friends and need to be revisited often.

debby said...

I forgot to mention my recent run-in with TSA coming home from Paducah. And over a hairbrush, for crying out loud! They weren't even afraid it was anything dangerous, they kept saying "We think you have shampoo in there". Argh!

Susie said...

Oh Bonnie! Atlas Shrugged is my all time favorite book. I have read it twice and listened to it once. You are right about being relevant to today. I also got my sons to read it and they loved it too.

Evelyn aka Starfishy said...

Bonnie - instead of scissors for plane travel... if you are just cutting thread - bring a dental floss container and use that tiny built in razor blade - works like a charm and is allowed. Cheers! Evelyn

chrisee said...

thanks for the reply Bonnie...and for everyones comments. I do own a "thread cutter pendant" but the dental floss container is a great idea.

j said...

Half my family has listened to Atlas Shrugged and cannot get over how timely it remains...the other half are in denial.

I know who John Galt is, what I really need to know is where is he NOW!